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tuvok42
04-12-2012, 10:37 AM
I'm thinking about turning my season ending online football banquet into a practice session for a KCBS tounrnament. I got 8 to 12 gamers coming over. I bought a packer, 3 slabs of ribs, a 8lb shoulder and some thighs. Besides the fact that these guys aren't judges i think i can get some feed back on appearance and taste. Anyone ever try this?

Smokin' D
04-12-2012, 10:54 AM
We did something like that before our very first comp. Invited about 40 people, the two of us each did the four meat categories so the judges could decide which was the preferred recipe. We also adhered to the KCBS rules for garnish and turn-in times. Helped a lot. We even had a teen band performing so it would feel just like a real contest. Somehow even managed to get some very high winds and sideways rain thrown in for good measure!

Ron_L
04-12-2012, 11:15 AM
If you're going to do this, do it right. Use standard turn in time and setup in the yard or driveway just like you would for a comp. Then, keep track of anything that you have to go into the house to get. That way you're practicing your setup, fine tuning you packing list and practicing the cooking.

Ashmont
04-12-2012, 11:27 AM
If you're going to do this, do it right. Use standard turn in time and setup in the yard or driveway just like you would for a comp. Then, keep track of anything that you have to go into the house to get. That way you're practicing your setup, fine tuning you packing list and practicing the cooking.


Pack up the vehical and drive for 3 hours around town. Get back home and unpack cook ect all weekend. Pay the neighbor kid to spray you with a hose like a rainstorm. Then pack up drive another 3 hours around town. Come home unpack...


Seriously good luck it is an awesome exp.

tuvok42
04-12-2012, 11:56 AM
Well i just don,t know what i got myself into. But the turn in times sounds like a good idea. I,ll just pretend that im being sprayed with hose.

Podge
04-12-2012, 12:40 PM
They would not be good unbiased people.. it'll all taste great to them.

4uweque
04-12-2012, 01:36 PM
They would not be good unbiased people.. it'll all taste great to them.

Same problem I have. But working on your timeline and documenting EVERYTHING is certainly worth the effort.

Wampus
04-12-2012, 01:48 PM
If you're going to do this, do it right. Use standard turn in time and setup in the yard or driveway just like you would for a comp. Then, keep track of anything that you have to go into the house to get. That way you're practicing your setup, fine tuning you packing list and practicing the cooking.

Yeah and stay up real late and only "sleep" for 3 hours in a chair too. :laugh:

Hey, may as well go all the way to make it realistic!




Good luck on the practice! It makes perfect you know!

GQue
04-12-2012, 01:51 PM
Yes I do something like this...but I found the best thing to do is just have them score taste as they have no perspective on appearance of tenderness and they tend to see what there neighbor is scoring so that they dont look foolish - Remind them that there are no wrong answers - You will get low scrores 4-7 but recognize that they have never been to a CBJ class so dont have the perspective.

LoneStar Smoke Rangers
04-12-2012, 02:37 PM
If you're going to do this, do it right. Use standard turn in time and setup in the yard or driveway just like you would for a comp. Then, keep track of anything that you have to go into the house to get. That way you're practicing your setup, fine tuning you packing list and practicing the cooking.

I would focus more on the timeline, the practice of cooking meats, and adhearing to the actual turnin times then the judging comments. I've done this a few times and it can be helpful and fun.

Ashmont
04-12-2012, 02:45 PM
Dont forget the sun block and over induldge in favorite beverage. Make it really real and use styro foam clam shells. Oh also with turnin times walk around the block 4 times with said turnin box to simulate how far you will have to walk to actually turnin your entry.


All kidding aside
Again this is a memory of a life time and you will want to do it again...

huminie
04-12-2012, 02:54 PM
I've never gotten any good feedback from friends and family. They always rave about it and aren't critical enough.

Make sure you give them score cards and ask them to take notes of the flavors, textures etc. You might be able to glean a few nuggets.

Practicing is well worth while, and it is fun to have friends enjoy your results. Just don't expect to get much actionable feedback from them.

RangerJ
04-12-2012, 05:14 PM
Here is an idea.

Just enter the competition, show up and cook...

The day I give score cards to friends and family is the day I find a new hobby.

Folks come to my house to eat and thats all I expect of them.

Muzzlebrake
04-12-2012, 05:26 PM
Like the others have said, I don't think that friends and family will give you contest worthy feedback about your product. At a contest you are going to be in a field full of people who's friends and families told them their food was great.

I do think it can be used as an effective way to practice your process. If you setup "turn in times" it can be a good way to fine tune your timing.

Lake Dogs
04-12-2012, 07:29 PM
It really depends on what you're looking for (as a result) from the practice. If you're looking to develop and hit a timeline, this is fine, and you'll get told how great the Q is. However, if you're looking for honest feedback regarding your recipes, you'll need at least 10 people, approximately the same age as most judges (probably average age is 55), stone cold sober, sampling MULTIPLE recipes. Yep, you'll need to cook 2 or 3 or 4 different recipes. Get them to judge them against one another. Also, MANY different sauces. Get them to mix and match them. THEN you'll get feedback on recipes and which is best. Also, you want a few smokers and a few hard-core non-smokers in the mix. Otherwise, just focus on a timeline.

tyotrain
04-12-2012, 10:23 PM
Pack up the vehical and drive for 3 hours around town. Get back home and unpack cook ect all weekend. Pay the neighbor kid to spray you with a hose like a rainstorm. Then pack up drive another 3 hours around town. Come home unpack...


Seriously good luck it is an awesome exp.


I love this one...

CBQ
04-12-2012, 11:47 PM
Pack up the vehical and drive for 3 hours around town. Get back home and unpack cook ect all weekend. Pay the neighbor kid to spray you with a hose like a rainstorm. Then pack up drive another 3 hours around town. Come home unpack...

That's a good start. To finish the job:

Find a radio station you hate and turn it all the way up. Refer to it as "the band".
Put your work table in a kiddie pool, fill it with water. Place a live extension cord in the pool, preferrably one that has a few tears in the insulation. Stand in the pool while you work.
Ask a neighbor to come by every 10 minutes when you are preparing your boxes and ask for samples. Tell them to argue with you about it at least once an hour.
At the end, give yourself a small trophy with a plastic animal on top. It only takes one to make you forget about steps 1, 2, and 3. :crazy:

tuvok42
04-13-2012, 07:07 AM
Thanks everyone for your advice, I'll make a decision based own how much time i have and the events of the banquet. Hopefully pictures to come...

chromestacks
04-13-2012, 09:04 AM
Well, I just did something very similar. Here is what I found:

Good friend showed up the night before and we really indulged in our favorite adult drink (very similar to the actual event)

Day of the event, 10 of the 30 guests showed up 2 hrs early and provided a good distraction

rain snow wind all day long

Had all 35 guests "judge" by KCBS "rules" presentation was done in 1/2 sheet X 4" deep hotel pans garnished with curly parsley

Good mix of smoking and non smoking judges, saltine crackers and water to clense the palate between samples

Results: Chicken DQ'd (dogs attacked it while it was resting on the shop bench (did I say the guests provided a good distraction?) only 1 piece left to present!

Ribs mostly 8,7,8.....comments "too much pepper" "sauce too thin" "difficult to pull from the bone" (funny, there is no pepper in my rib rub!)

Pork: 9,8,9....comments "very appetizing appeal" "Excellent color" "very clear smoke ring, nice bark" "slices very uniform, perfectly sauced" (not exactly sure why I got the 8)

Brisket: 8,7,7.....comments "smoke ring not even" "burnt ends spicy" "passed the pull test but a little undercooked to my standards" "slices even, presented well"

All in, This is about the usual for contest scores for me with the exception of chicken, We leave the dogs at the doggie hotel! Deffinately drank too much the night before! Weather conditions were in line for a typical contest. Everyone had a great time, We had a huge fire to "celebrate" and I was presented a foil trophy by one of my co-workers! It was fun and i will do it again sometime :)

tuvok42
04-23-2012, 09:36 PM
I had to fix a plumbing problem the night before my test run so i didn't get my meat marinaded on time. put my brisket on the smoker at 1.40am at 220. Went to bed got up at 5am when the alarm co. called said i needed a new smoke detector battery. checked meat smoker was at 250 meat was 220 no kiding 220. took it off put it in foil for about 3hrs. then added beef aujue put back on smoker for 3 more hrs. cleaned up back yard in meantime guest arrived at 2pm We had our meeting and chicken judging started at 4pm ribs 4.30. pork 5pm brisket at 5.30pm 5 judges gave marks for appearance, texture and taste. got some feed back. great practice. by the way the brisket turned out great. gotta figure out how to go low and slow.

Lake Dogs
04-24-2012, 07:25 AM
Looks like you had a great time! Congrats.

FYI: 250 IS low and slow. For many/most of us, 220 is too low and too slow, and frankly is a waste of time. Anything under 300 is low and slow. Most competitors cook brisket and pork in the 240-270 range, cook ribs in that 270-280 range, and chicken is all over the map frankly (some cook way up around 400 or more).

Porcine Perfection
04-24-2012, 03:37 PM
If I understand your post, your brisket went from raw to 220 in 3hrs. 20 min.. Something is not right there. Either your thermometer is not right or you smoker was a lot hotter than 250 degrees while you were sleeping. I don't compete, but if I did, I would stay awake monitoring everything.

Glad everybody was happy and you had a good time. That is the main thing.

tuvok42
04-28-2012, 04:48 PM
The brisket was accually 4 and 1/2 hrs. on the smoker and your right i should stay up. Problem is every one love the brisket so i'm wondering how different it would turn out if i pulled it when the temp reached 185 and probe was easily moved.