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KingRanch450
12-31-2011, 09:10 PM
I was wondering if KCBS judges are compensated for their time....other than getting to eat free BBQ.

Pig Headed
12-31-2011, 09:25 PM
No, they're not compensated. Many spend a lot of time and money traveling to and from competitions. They're in it for many reasons. Some cook also and it helps to see what judges are looking for, some are backyard cooks, some just because they love BBQ.

KingRanch450
12-31-2011, 09:29 PM
No, they're not compensated. Many spend a lot of time and money traveling to and from competitions. They're in it for many reasons. Some cook also and it helps to see what judges are looking for, some are backyard cooks, some just because they love BBQ.

Thank u sir

Rookie'48
12-31-2011, 10:46 PM
Although you do realize that a Master CBJ gets exactly double what a regular CBJ gets, right?

:rolleyes: :grin:


Really, I do it because I have a lot of friends who are cooks and I enjoy visiting with them on Friday evening and then after judging and at the awards.

This is a hobby / sport / obsession that does cost a bit when you add up the miles that I travel doing 12 to 15 contests a year and dragging my 30 foot fifth wheel around the country.

But then again - I don't have near the $$$ wrapped up in this that the average cook team does :mrgreen:.

bbq.tom
12-31-2011, 11:35 PM
With KCBS and MBN judging there is NO compensation for judging, and some events even require the judge to pay an entry fee to judge. A few of the North Carolina Pork Council events that I judge actually pay the judges $50 for judging a competition.

drbbq
01-01-2012, 12:32 AM
Judges get paid nothing but you have to also understand that there are about 60,000 who have passed the CBJ course and zero have failed the course so the value is pretty much nil.

ribsrdone
01-01-2012, 01:20 AM
Ray, I hope you're questioning the value of the certification course and not the value of judges. Many of us study and practice prep,cooking,flavor profiles and other components of good tasting, competition quality bbq. I and many others I've met try very hard to be good judges. My wife and I traveled over 7000 miles last year to judge various contests. It gets a little old when we hear others denounce the quality of judges. Some people are painting with a pretty big brush it seems. It's been my experience that when you have large groups of people, both good and bad elements are found.

KingRanch450
01-01-2012, 07:30 AM
I'm a little surprised they aren't compensated. You have to pay to join KCBS, pay for the judging school, pay for your travel and I haven't even gotten to the time you put in. My hats are off to yall....there has to be some dedication there for all of that.:thumb:

Smoke'n Ice
01-01-2012, 08:15 AM
Judges get paid nothing but you have to also understand that there are about 60,000 who have passed the CBJ course and zero have failed the course so the value is pretty much nil.

Do I detect the cynicism of someone who has not taken the class for fear of failing? :heh: I'll bet that most of the folks who have taken the class will not even vote this January.

drbbq
01-01-2012, 09:07 AM
I know there are many dedicated good judges but there is no real way to know who they are. The CBJ program is excellent as a PR thing but pretty much useless for training judges. And while I appreciate some doing their own education it can make for a wide discrepancy among judges skills.
As a cook I get tired of hearing about all the miles judges travel. Hey they do it because it's their hobby and they like to travel just like the cooks do. Hobbies cost money. Very few cooks are making money doing contests. BTW I'm also a judge and I'm flying to Houston in Feb to judge and it never crossed my mind that I'd get paid or get travel money.

thillin
01-01-2012, 12:37 PM
I know there are many dedicated good judges but there is no real way to know who they are. The CBJ program is excellent as a PR thing but pretty much useless for training judges. And while I appreciate some doing their own education it can make for a wide discrepancy among judges skills...

I agree. Even though I've only cooked a couple KCBS events (mainly cook IBCA). Just because a judge is certigied doesn't make them a better judge than someone who is not. IBCA goes over judging criteria before judging. IBCA does fine without certified judges, and I'm sure KCBS could also.

Just my opinion, and I have no hard feelings towards any CBJs, but you won't get me to pay to be certified.

Q-Dat
01-01-2012, 04:56 PM
As a cook I get tired of hearing about all the miles judges travel.

I totally agree! I'm still a newbie so right now I'm only cooking local comps. It has been brought to my attention that many of the event organizers don't want to use first time judges down here. If this is true, I think that is bogus! Local judges should be given first shot at judging local events. This leads me to wonder if imported judges are being brought in to make many of the big name points chasers happy.

HarleyEarl
01-01-2012, 08:27 PM
I personally value the CBJ program and the CBJ's. As a cook, the CBJ program gives me a standard to cook for, however when you have non-CBJ's/celebs you never know what your scores are going to look like (ever get scored down for a perfectly cooked rib and get a comment card that says the meat didn't fall off the bone?).

I average competing at over 12 contest per year and have found that, in all but very few instances, when I get low scores, I just have to look in the mirror to see the problem. Yes, every once in a while you will come across a hard table of judges, but that's the breaks. I guess I just had to grow up and quit blaming judges for my poor performances in the past.

As far as the judges traveling, I'm all for it. If anyone of you have ever met Dave, Rookie'48, you know he is one of the most knowledgeable individuals out there not to mention his love of the sport. Talking with him and other judges after the contest has shown me that they really love what they do and take it very serious. I would love to have a band of traveling Master CBJ's at any contest I am at rather than .... well, I'll just leave it at that.

As cooks, we should be thanking these individuals for their unselfish dedication to make our sport better. Those who are bagging on them should either get to know the judges or shut the frac up! Just MHO for what it's worth.

Rookie'48
01-01-2012, 11:32 PM
I'll bet that most of the folks who have taken the class will not even vote this January.

And that is something that pi$$es me off :mad2:. The e-ballot is right there on the computer - all you have to do is log in & VOTE. Last year less than 20% of the eligible members bothered to vote.

Basically we have 50% +1 of 18% of the membership electing the Bod :confused:. I guess that's ok with some folks but it still ticks me off.

Q-Dat
01-02-2012, 12:10 AM
I personally value the CBJ program and the CBJ's. As a cook, the CBJ program gives me a standard to cook for, however when you have non-CBJ's/celebs you never know what your scores are going to look like (ever get scored down for a perfectly cooked rib and get a comment card that says the meat didn't fall off the bone?).

I average competing at over 12 contest per year and have found that, in all but very few instances, when I get low scores, I just have to look in the mirror to see the problem. Yes, every once in a while you will come across a hard table of judges, but that's the breaks. I guess I just had to grow up and quit blaming judges for my poor performances in the past.

As far as the judges traveling, I'm all for it. If anyone of you have ever met Dave, Rookie'48, you know he is one of the most knowledgeable individuals out there not to mention his love of the sport. Talking with him and other judges after the contest has shown me that they really love what they do and take it very serious. I would love to have a band of traveling Master CBJ's at any contest I am at rather than .... well, I'll just leave it at that.

As cooks, we should be thanking these individuals for their unselfish dedication to make our sport better. Those who are bagging on them should either get to know the judges or shut the frac up! Just MHO for what it's worth.

I guess I should re-phrase myself. I have no real issue with judges traveling, I just don't like the idea that we could have locals that have taken the class and gotten certified but can't find a contest to judge at because they fill up with out of state judges.

thillin
01-02-2012, 06:56 AM
As cooks, we should be thanking these individuals for their unselfish dedication to make our sport better. Those who are bagging on them should either get to know the judges or shut the frac up! Just MHO for what it's worth.

Not bagging from me, just pointing out that judging can work well with "seasoned" judges that don't have to be certified.

HarleyEarl
01-02-2012, 08:10 AM
I guess I should re-phrase myself. I have no real issue with judges traveling, I just don't like the idea that we could have locals that have taken the class and gotten certified but can't find a contest to judge at because they fill up with out of state judges.

The issue could be planning on the judges part - I'm sure many of the traveling judges line out which contests they want to judge at prior to the season and either contact the contest organizer early and ask to be put on the mailing list for judge applications or they keep an eye out for the contest to be announced and send in their application immediately. You can't wait until the last minute and decide you want to judge "next weekend" and complain you can't get in.

Another issue could be reliability - the organizers value judges who actually show up to judge. The traveling judges have made a commitment in time and money to travel to these contests and for the most part can be relied on to appear. If they can't make it, I'm sure they contact the organizer ahead of time and let them know so a replacement can be found.

Most contests end up with at least a few no-shows, so the local judges who really want to judge could attend the contest and be on-call if this happens.

Drh7003
01-02-2012, 08:18 AM
I am interested in becoming a judge, for a couple of reasons:
1) I like great BBQ
2) I want to learn how to make great BBQ

I am new to the forum, but have been cooking for 30+ years. Kitchen cooking has become a little dull and I love cooking outdoors and making BBQ.

HarleyEarl
01-02-2012, 08:30 AM
Not bagging from me, just pointing out that judging can work well with "seasoned" judges that don't have to be certified.

You might be right, but not from my experience. There is a local contest that is wonderfully run and I have really enjoyed competing at in the past, but they boast only 18% CBJ - most of the judges are celebs from the local community which is great for PR. I quit doing this contest a few years ago since I stepped my game up and want to work my way up the TOY ladder (which I admit, I have a way to go) - I value the consistency of scores I see with contests with at least 80% CBJ's. The reason I stopped attending that contest was the last year I was there, I turned in pork that should have been DAL by all standards and I got a call - it was mush. I also had to slice the brisket almost a half inch thick to keep it together-just out of the top 10. It was the worst cook by far for me that season where nothing went right and I was in the top ten overall. Should have never happened.

Another example was a contest last year early in the season with over 100 teams that claims 40% CBJ on the result page, however, speaking with a trusted Master CBJ who was in the judge's hall, there were no more than 25 judges who raise their hands when asked who was certified. My scores were all over the place with no consistency - how can one judge give you a 5 and another a 9 in tenderness for brisket? IMO it was probably in the 8 range. But how do you improve with scores like these? This is another contest I will no longer support and judging is just the tip of the iceberg for this decision.

Bottom line - the higher percentage of CBJ's results in more consistency in your scores and gives you a basis for improvement. There may be some exceptions, but my vote is for a high percentage of seasoned CBJ's at any given contest.

thillin
01-02-2012, 10:14 AM
but they boast only 18% CBJ - most of the judges are celebs from the local community which is great for PR. ...

We seem to look for the same thing "seasoned" judges. There are comps across TX that go through the same thing. But either way, the cream seems to rise to the top. Remember, if your scores are all over the board, so is theirs. But that is the chance that cooks take at any comp, CBJs or not.

QansasjayhawQ
01-02-2012, 11:56 AM
I am interested in becoming a judge, for a couple of reasons:
1) I like great BBQ
2) I want to learn how to make great BBQ

I am new to the forum, but have been cooking for 30+ years. Kitchen cooking has become a little dull and I love cooking outdoors and making BBQ.
That's exactly why I got started.

If people want their local competitions to have more local judges, then they should volunteer to help the event organizers to arrange for that.

An event organizer chooses who they send 'acceptance' notices to for judging. I think that, to make it most fair, a certain percentage should be new judges (new judges have to start somewhere, right?), a certain percentage experienced judges, a percentage master judges and a certain number of local/celeb. judges.

But - the bottom line on all that is - it is up to the event organizer to decide who they want to judge at their competition and what their preferred mix of experience is.

I always try to share what I've learned with new judges at each contest. It makes for great conversation while waiting. And, I learn a lot that way too. Overall, communication between judges before judging starts goes a long way towards improving the overall quality of the judging.

But, to answer the question and keep this on topic - no. Judges are not normally financially compensated for their services.

bbqbrad
01-02-2012, 08:24 PM
I am about to become a KCBS judge. But I had a bad judge the last comp. I turned in chicken that my thermometer said was just BARELY at the safe temp. A comment card said it was overcooked. That's a 20 to 30 degree difference. In my opinion, the judge was trying to show off. That's when I have a problem with the judges. They need to be trained better.

Twelvegaugepump
01-02-2012, 08:39 PM
And that is something that pi$$es me off :mad2:. The e-ballot is right there on the computer - all you have to do is log in & VOTE. Last year less than 20% of the eligible members bothered to vote.

Basically we have 50% +1 of 18% of the membership electing the Bod :confused:. I guess that's ok with some folks but it still ticks me off.

I just voted.

Bunny
01-02-2012, 09:23 PM
I'm a little surprised they aren't compensated. You have to pay to join KCBS, pay for the judging school, pay for your travel and I haven't even gotten to the time you put in. My hats are off to yall....there has to be some dedication there for all of that.:thumb:

Cooks aren't compensated unless they win. They pay dues, pay for cooking classes, travel, all their gear, plus they buy their own meat, pay their entry fee and buy a drink or two for their pals that come by to say, "hey". I beleive their is definately some dedication there, too. :-D

Just Smokin' Around
01-02-2012, 09:42 PM
And that is something that pi$$es me off :mad2:. The e-ballot is right there on the computer - all you have to do is log in & VOTE. Last year less than 20% of the eligible members bothered to vote.

Basically we have 50% +1 of 18% of the membership electing the Bod :confused:. I guess that's ok with some folks but it still ticks me off.

Dave, I understand what you're saying, but, watch what you ask for. If they just go and vote without educating themselves on the candidates and the issues, then they vote for names they might recognize or just any 4 names that sound good. Then, you get a popularity contest (probably how Paul Kirk got elected).

I don't think folks should blindly vote party line in politics either, but, many do, without even reading who they are and what they stand for (sometimes the other guy is a better choice).

It would be nice if folks took a few minutes to read, then vote - in ALL elections.

Rookie'48
01-02-2012, 10:03 PM
Dave, I understand what you're saying, but, watch what you ask for. If they just go and vote without educating themselves on the candidates and the issues, then they vote for names they might recognize or just any 4 names that sound good. Then, you get a popularity contest (probably how Paul Kirk got elected).

I don't think folks should blindly vote party line in politics either, but, many do, without even reading who they are and what they stand for (sometimes the other guy is a better choice).

It would be nice if folks took a few minutes to read, then vote - in ALL elections.

Bill, you're probably right about this :doh:. Just because I try to read up on the issues I assume that most other folks do also - and we all know how the word assume breaks down!

tdwalker
01-03-2012, 09:47 AM
In reply to the original post, I had never expected to be compensated as a KCBS judge. I do it for the love of BBQ, and to feel as if I am doing "my part" as a BBQ citizen.

I have restricted myself to a distance limit of three hours driving one way, which allows plenty of contests. I will occasionally do an overnight stay, particularly if the area has something else to offer.

My time, gas, tolls and, sometimes, lodging costs are significant, but nowhere near that of even a part-time competitor. However, a competitor has a chance to earn his/her money back, I do not. As to the argument of "Free BBQ," I can be far more cost effective cooking myself or going to local joints.

Rich Parker
01-03-2012, 11:46 AM
In reply to the original post, I had never expected to be compensated as a KCBS judge. I do it for the love of BBQ, and to feel as if I am doing "my part" as a BBQ citizen.

I have restricted myself to a distance limit of three hours driving one way, which allows plenty of contests. I will occasionally do an overnight stay, particularly if the area has something else to offer.

My time, gas, tolls and, sometimes, lodging costs are significant, but nowhere near that of even a part-time competitor. However, a competitor has a chance to earn his/her money back, I do not. As to the argument of "Free BBQ," I can be far more cost effective cooking myself or going to local joints.

But would the food be as good? :becky:

As a cook, I appreciate all CBJs for showing up and judging the competitions I am involved in because in the end it takes both committed judges and cooks to make a good competition.

Arlin_MacRae
01-03-2012, 12:41 PM
In reply to the original post, I had never expected to be compensated as a KCBS judge. I do it for the love of BBQ, and to feel as if I am doing "my part" as a BBQ citizen.

I have restricted myself to a distance limit of three hours driving one way, which allows plenty of contests. I will occasionally do an overnight stay, particularly if the area has something else to offer.

My time, gas, tolls and, sometimes, lodging costs are significant, but nowhere near that of even a part-time competitor. However, a competitor has a chance to earn his/her money back, I do not. As to the argument of "Free BBQ," I can be far more cost effective cooking myself or going to local joints.
This. Exactly.
Jean and I haven't yet judged so far afield that we had to spend the night, but I see that coming this year. Costs? Bah. If we didn't want to be part of this community we'd stay in the back yard and off the Brethren. :rolleyes:

thillin
01-03-2012, 12:43 PM
This. Exactly.
Jean and I haven't yet judged so far afield that we had to spend the night, but I see that coming this year. Costs? Bah. If we didn't want to be part of this community we'd stay in the back yard and off the Brethren. :rolleyes:

Labor Day weekend Bedford, TX?

tdwalker
01-03-2012, 01:26 PM
But would the food be as good? :becky:



:thumb: I think I'm about to find that out. I am planning on competing this year.

From my judging experience .... on any given day and any given category, I think that my "at home bbq" is better then a minimum of 4 of 6 entries. Sometimes better than that. I mostly chalk that up to "cooking to taste" that I do at home.

I'm hoping with practice and experience, I'll be able to compete at a respectable level.

carlyle
01-03-2012, 02:52 PM
Several points I wish to comment on:

As others have said - no compensation for judges. Other than my thanks and gratitude, plus a goodie bag like the teams receive and a pin for our contest.

When I am selecting judges to come to our contest, I first choose cbj's that I have previous positive experiences with. They are the nucleus of the crew. Plus if there is anyone I have negative experiences with for any reason, they go to the bottom of the pile- I am lucky, very few in this category.

In last years contest 70% of our judges , and we are 100% CBJ's, were from my home state of Minnesota. Within the minority of out of state judges I had cbj's from Illinois, Michigan, Indiana, and Canada. If a judge is willing to travel that far to come to our contest, I will do what I can to make it happen.

No-shows - I am lucky. That has not been a problem here. Everyone who says they will be there shows up. Hope that continues.

The down side- I had to turn away almost 30% of the judges who applied because we did not have enough teams to use everyone.

The biggest complication is teams that wait to the very last minute to register, or just show up on contest day. Matching judges with the number of teams is the "dance" that everyone who does this job deals with. So far that has been a very manageable problem, and I am thankful for every team who decides to come to us.

Sorry to make this post so much about me and our contest, but it is a perspective I did not see when I read the other postings in this most interesting thread.

Jorge
01-03-2012, 06:43 PM
We seem to look for the same thing "seasoned" judges. There are comps across TX that go through the same thing. But either way, the cream seems to rise to the top. Remember, if your scores are all over the board, so is theirs. But that is the chance that cooks take at any comp, CBJs or not.

I see both sides. Judges tend to get it right whether 'certified' or not. I know about cooking at the VFW in Texas and the proverbial wisdom:wink: It's different, but as I said the judges usually get it right and the cooks that do well in KCBS and in Texas prove that.

That being said, and having started out cooking in Texas, I think there is a consistency you get from KCBS and certified judges that you don't get in Texas. Beyond that, you get feedback in the form of raw scores from those same judges. In Texas you get to go try and find a reasonable bite left on a half a bird to figure out what hit. In KCBS you get to crunch numbers.

Odds in Vegas are better than either, but not as much fun unless you want to get arrested.

Arlin_MacRae
01-03-2012, 07:20 PM
Labor Day weekend Bedford, TX?

The only conflict we might have is the Quapaw, OK, comp, and we haven't been to that one yet, so why not?

Don't we know somebody in Bedford, too? :rolleyes:

Bentley
01-03-2012, 07:39 PM
That's when I have a problem with the judges. They need to be trained better.


How would you accomplish this?

El Pistolero
01-04-2012, 03:47 PM
This seemed like a good thread to ask this question: I'm signed up for a CBJ class this Saturday, and I'm wondering where do I go from here. Do I just need to start contacting organizers to request judging apps? Does Sam's Club (for example) have an overall judging coordinator, or will I need to contact the organizers of each individual event.

Any enlightenment you'all can provide will be greatly appreciated.

Rich Parker
01-04-2012, 04:40 PM
This seemed like a good thread to ask this question: I'm signed up for a CBJ class this Saturday, and I'm wondering where do I go from here. Do I just need to start contacting organizers to request judging apps? Does Sam's Club (for example) have an overall judging coordinator, or will I need to contact the organizers of each individual event.

Any enlightenment you'all can provide will be greatly appreciated.

Go to the event section of KCBS (http://www.kcbs.us/events.php) and you will be able to find the events you are interested in along with the contact info to the organizer. The Sam's Club tour has an online signup for both the cooks and the judges and you can read about it here (http://kcbs.us/news.php?id=441)

Jorge
01-04-2012, 04:41 PM
Look at the schedule, contact organizers and go from there. For Sam's Club judges applied online last year. I suspect it will be the same this year.

Stoke&Smoke
01-04-2012, 05:03 PM
Edit...Jorge beat me to the punch! - sorry

This seemed like a good thread to ask this question: I'm signed up for a CBJ class this Saturday, and I'm wondering where do I go from here. Do I just need to start contacting organizers to request judging apps? Does Sam's Club (for example) have an overall judging coordinator, or will I need to contact the organizers of each individual event.

Any enlightenment you'all can provide will be greatly appreciated.

Pistolero,

If it's a KCBS judges class you'll be taking, look at the contest schedule in the Bullsheet, or at the KCBS site. You can see which are in either your area, or an area you don't mind traveling to. They generally list the organizers, and a link to their contact info. Generally speaking, the earlier the better to ensure a spot.

arrowhead
01-04-2012, 06:30 PM
This seemed like a good thread to ask this question: I'm signed up for a CBJ class this Saturday, and I'm wondering where do I go from here. Do I just need to start contacting organizers to request judging apps? Does Sam's Club (for example) have an overall judging coordinator, or will I need to contact the organizers of each individual event.

Any enlightenment you'all can provide will be greatly appreciated.

some contest websites will have judges applications. you can access them thru the kcbs website. if you interested in judging contests in colorado, new mexico, kansas, nebraska, check out the judges liaison program at http://rmbbqa.org/jlp/ it's a one stop shop for registrations.

KingRanch450
01-04-2012, 06:45 PM
Cooks aren't compensated unless they win. They pay dues, pay for cooking classes, travel, all their gear, plus they buy their own meat, pay their entry fee and buy a drink or two for their pals that come by to say, "hey". I beleive their is definately some dedication there, too. :-D

There is no doubt there is dedication from the cookers. To me that is not a question, but as you pointed out when you pay your entry and everything else you have to pay for....there is a chance of winning $, trophies and gain some respect from fellow competitors and bragging rights....not to mention if you win enough there are other marketing opportunities out there. That being said I'm sure just like any other hobby you'll spend way more than you win. My point was I'm surprised you have to pay to be a judge and really don't get anything in return other than a bellyfull of BBQ. I have the utmost respect for both sides and hope to get into comp cooking someday. Just the opinion of a newbie from the outside looking in. :thumb:

mobow
01-04-2012, 07:03 PM
Cooks put into it what they want to. Judges put into it what they want to. When it i's not fun any more they both quit. Keith

smoke-n-my-i's
01-04-2012, 07:59 PM
Do I detect the cynicism of someone who has not taken the class for fear of failing? :heh: I'll bet that most of the folks who have taken the class will not even vote this January.

I do, and I did.....

Rookie'48
01-05-2012, 02:31 PM
Cooks put into it what they want to. Judges put into it what they want to. When it i's not fun any more they both quit. Keith

That's the bottom line right there, Keith. I do it because it's fun.

smoke-n-my-i's
01-07-2012, 05:41 PM
I personally value the CBJ program and the CBJ's. As a cook, the CBJ program gives me a standard to cook for, however when you have non-CBJ's/celebs you never know what your scores are going to look like (ever get scored down for a perfectly cooked rib and get a comment card that says the meat didn't fall off the bone?).

I average competing at over 12 contest per year and have found that, in all but very few instances, when I get low scores, I just have to look in the mirror to see the problem. Yes, every once in a while you will come across a hard table of judges, but that's the breaks. I guess I just had to grow up and quit blaming judges for my poor performances in the past.

As far as the judges traveling, I'm all for it. If anyone of you have ever met Dave, Rookie'48, you know he is one of the most knowledgeable individuals out there not to mention his love of the sport. Talking with him and other judges after the contest has shown me that they really love what they do and take it very serious. I would love to have a band of traveling Master CBJ's at any contest I am at rather than .... well, I'll just leave it at that.

As cooks, we should be thanking these individuals for their unselfish dedication to make our sport better. Those who are bagging on them should either get to know the judges or shut the frac up! Just MHO for what it's worth.

But remember, he started at the bottom as well, and had to work his way up just like all the other newbies.... you have to start somewhere, and if the contest only wants CBJ's, how will a newbie get to be a CBJ??????

smoke-n-my-i's
01-07-2012, 05:52 PM
How would you accomplish this?

here is my 2 cents worth...
first off, I have cooked at several comps.... second off, I can not judge as I am allergic to pork and can not eat it.... I am now a CTC, thanks to KCBS dropping the requirements to be a CBJ before you could table captain....

I think "newbie" judges should be mentored.... as not every new judge has ever cooked nor competed, they may not know what all is involved and what to look for. That is where I do not agree 100% with the no talking at the judging table, but I do see why they request it....

so maybe if there were several new judges, before they judge their first official comp, they set up a "MOCK" judging table and have teams sign up to provide boxes for that table to "learn" on... what to look for in presentations, tenderness, etc.... I know they teach it is not to be judged on your own preference, but what is presented to you... BUT.... well, you get the point.

just my thoughts....

HarleyEarl
01-07-2012, 09:33 PM
But remember, he started at the bottom as well, and had to work his way up just like all the other newbies.... you have to start somewhere, and if the contest only wants CBJ's, how will a newbie get to be a CBJ??????

Short answer - Anyone can become a CBJ, just sign up and take a class.

Long answer - Now as far as actually judging a contest, the "newbie" CBJ needs to plan ahead by either contacting the contest organizer early and ask to be put on the mailing list for judge applications or they keep an eye out for the contest to be announced and send in their application immediately. In both cases, let the organizer know you are a new CBJ and are serious about judging. The "newbie" can also ask to be paired with Master CBJ's. I'm sure many organizers would appreciate your willingness to not only judge but learn from more experienced judges. Not saying this will work, but building a rapport with the organizer can't hurt your chances.

smoke-n-my-i's
01-08-2012, 02:15 PM
I was way out in left field on that one.... my mind was thinking master judge... :doh:

Rookie'48
01-09-2012, 11:26 AM
When I first started judging I asked my Table Captain to keep an eye on my scores & let me know if I was too far out of line with the other judges at the table. I didn't want to be giving out 6s if everyone was scoring 8s & 9s - or vice versa.

Where a newbie judge really starts their learning proccess is when the judges talk quietly amongst themselves after the score cards are turned in. You'l hear things like: "What about rib #3? The meat fell of as I was taking it out of the box" or "That #6 pork had some great slices & chunks - why did he put in that mushy pulled? It sure cost him big time" or "That second brisket entry - man you could have used it for a tow strap!" or "That guy who turned in those drummies - he had it all together on that one!" or . . .

You get the idea :grin:.

Arlin_MacRae
01-09-2012, 05:45 PM
When I first started judging I asked my Table Captain to keep an eye on my scores & let me know if I was too far out of line with the other judges at the table. I didn't want to be giving out 6s if everyone was scoring 8s & 9s - or vice versa.

Where a newbie judge really starts their learning proccess is when the judges talk quietly amongst themselves after the score cards are turned in. You'l hear things like: "What about rib #3? The meat fell of as I was taking it out of the box" or "That #6 pork had some great slices & chunks - why did he put in that mushy pulled? It sure cost him big time" or "That second brisket entry - man you could have used it for a tow strap!" or "That guy who turned in those drummies - he had it all together on that one!" or . . .

You get the idea :grin:.

Great points, Dave. I've learned a lot from being mentored at the table by the more experienced judges and table captains. Don't be afraid to ask questions!