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tomace
09-19-2011, 09:24 PM
our team has competed in 9 kcbs comps. and we improve every contest. we finally recieved our first call in brisket for second place, but we seem to consistantly be stuck in the teens. any advice on what took your team into the top tens, or from our upper 160's into the 170's. needing something to do in the off season for our team. thanks!!!:flame:

Brewmaster
09-19-2011, 09:48 PM
You might not like this answer, but the best thing to is practice. Read what people post here, try it, and tweak it to fit your style. Or you could just spend the money and take a class.

Cheers,
Nate

jbrink01
09-19-2011, 10:17 PM
What Brewmaster said. Spend a small fortune and half your life, and someday you too can MAYBE break even..........:crazy:

Smokedelic
09-19-2011, 10:24 PM
Cook better?:idea:

No...seriously, you've got the answer in your post. You've competed 9 times and have improved with each contest. So after 20 contests, you'll be better than you are now. And if those 20 contests happen over the span of a summer, where you can develop some routines, you'll get the consistency that it takes to frequently score well. Take a look at how often the top scoring teams compete. There's something to be said for repetition.:thumb:

Pack-A-Smokes
09-19-2011, 10:35 PM
consistency! That is the most difficult thing to accomplish. The only way to do it is practice. Also, once you find something that works DO NOT CHANGE IT. We have found something that works and thought we could tweek it to get even higher scores and have been slapped down. 2nd or 3rd place is pretty darn good and the next comp could place 1st. DO NOT CHANGE WHAT SEEMS TO WORK. That being said, if if fails more than just a few comps change may be needed.
The crazy thing is ribs may bring a top 5 in two comps and then bring top 30 the next two or three.

ALX
09-20-2011, 01:37 AM
keep in it......

ALX
09-20-2011, 02:04 AM
Cook better?:idea:

No...seriously, you've got the answer in your post. You've competed 9 times and have improved with each contest. So after 20 contests, you'll be better than you are now. And if those 20 contests happen over the span of a summer, where you can develop some routines, you'll get the consistency that it takes to frequently score well. Take a look at how often the top scoring teams compete. There's something to be said for repetition.:thumb:


yep......so true........

roksmith
09-20-2011, 05:20 AM
Remember who you are cooking for. No matter how much you may like a particular rub, sauce, or technique, if the judges don't like it, Dump it.
Some do find early success, but as others have said.. it takes time. If it were easy, anyone could do it.

rookiedad
09-20-2011, 08:43 AM
Remember who you are cooking for. No matter how much you may like a particular rub, sauce, or technique, if the judges don't like it, Dump it.
Some do find early success, but as others have said.. it takes time. If it were easy, anyone could do it.

remember also that there is nothing worse than trying to "cook for" a judge and then getting scored down for it.
http://www.bbq-brethren.com/forum/showthread.php?t=116550
stay true to your Q, and concentrate on cooking the best bbq that YOU can possibly make!

ique
09-20-2011, 09:23 AM
our team has competed in 9 kcbs comps. and we improve every contest. we finally recieved our first call in brisket for second place, but we seem to consistantly be stuck in the teens. any advice on what took your team into the top tens, or from our upper 160's into the 170's. needing something to do in the off season for our team. thanks!!!:flame:

Your product needs to be super tender and moist. Flavors need to be classic barbecue with a nice balance of mild smoke, bold savory dry rub, very sweet glaze with a touch of tang or heat to balance it out. Professionally trimmed and neatly displayed in the box. Minimal garnish with the meat being the focus. If you can do this in all 4 categories on a consistent basis you will get lots of calls.

Pack-A-Smokes
09-20-2011, 09:31 AM
remember also that there is nothing worse than trying to "cook for" a judge and then getting scored down for it.
http://www.bbq-brethren.com/forum/showthread.php?t=116550
stay true to your Q, and concentrate on cooking the best bbq that YOU can possibly make!

Our first year I changed my BBQ depending upon the area. That was not the wisest thing to do and our scores showed it.:doh:

Scottie
09-20-2011, 09:35 AM
Pixie Dust. We will have a new product out in 2012...:becky:

Work on cooking meat. Forget flavors for now and worry about cooking and boxing the best you can. That is more easy to attain now, than flavors. Once you have those 2 down, worry about flavors. For now, I'd recommend FAB, Blues Hog and Smokin' Guns Hot rub... :thumb:

DawgPhan
09-20-2011, 09:42 AM
Pixie Dust. We will have a new product out in 2012...:becky:

Work on cooking meat. Forget flavors for now and worry about cooking and boxing the best you can. That is more easy to attain now, than flavors. Once you have those 2 down, worry about flavors. For now, I'd recommend FAB, Blues Hog and Smokin' Guns Hot rub... :thumb:


Did you hear...the judges dont like those flavors and are scoring them down...everyone should stop using them...







everyone but me that is...

tomace
09-20-2011, 11:12 AM
thanks everyone! been doing everything that was brought up, just don't get why we were getting 12th one comp. and the next we get a 30 something. sounds like everyone has the same issue from time to time. really appreciate the input! just stay true to my q and be patient with the results. ace

tmcmaster
09-20-2011, 11:24 AM
Be consistant
Practice
Pray you don't land on the same table as the EVIL Judge 6!

trohrs123
09-20-2011, 11:40 AM
Be consistant
Practice
Pray you don't land on the same table as the EVIL Judge 6!
Tim
weren't you judge 6 this past weekend?

Podge
09-20-2011, 12:02 PM
I do not believe a team has to cook a ton of contests to get good. But they need to cook a lot regardless. I cook 6-8 contests a year max., but I practice so much, I'd be embarrassed to admit the amount. My best advice is to get about 10-15 weekends over the winter where you're doing practice cooks. By the spring, you're ready to go and got that feel down.

sitnfat
09-20-2011, 12:44 PM
What Podge said... I also cook a ton when I ain't competing I also cook in all sorts of weather I don't have a fancy insulated cooker so she tends to be a little more temperamental in bad weather but I have practiced in it so I know what to expect and how to adjust for it

tmcmaster
09-20-2011, 12:51 PM
Tim
weren't you judge 6 this past weekend?
Nope. 3. Only HALF evil!:mad2:

mwert
09-20-2011, 08:58 PM
I started BBQing last year. I did my first sanctioned event this summer and got 6th. Then we did a non-sanctioned event with 20 teams and got GC. I attribute it to three things; I cooked every entry every way I thought or learned about, constantly surfed the web for more and better techniques(thanks to everyone here for posting great things), and, I don't have a TV.

Smokin Mike
09-21-2011, 05:46 PM
are you guys smoking aces ?

to kinda answer your question, I hate admit, it's practice. you got to nail down the tenderness, and taste. Worry about appearance latter.

Lake Dogs
09-21-2011, 05:50 PM
^^^ find a taste profile that works for you, then focus/work hard on tenderness. IMHO, the difference in the top 10% vs. that next 50% or so is tenderness. Meaning, the top 50 to 60% generally taste pretty darned good, but the top 10% nail tenderness.

Diva Q
09-21-2011, 06:39 PM
Practice . Then when you think you have practiced again practice more. When your family refuses to eat chicken move on to ribs and repeat for the 4 categories. Ask to try teams samples if possible that are better than you if you are at a ccomp. They may not share but you never know unless you ask. Listen to them when they speak. Take notes and have a good cooks log.Note time of day temperature and humidity levels. AS well as pit temps etc and location in the pit. Take a class. There are many great comp cooks out there that offer them. Review BBQtV you tube videos and listen to what the judges have to say for entries.

Mooner
09-21-2011, 08:37 PM
Practice . Then when you think you have practiced again practice more. When your family refuses to eat chicken move on to ribs and repeat for the 4 categories. Ask to try teams samples if possible that are better than you if you are at a ccomp. They may not share but you never know unless you ask. Listen to them when they speak. Take notes and have a good cooks log.Note time of day temperature and humidity levels. AS well as pit temps etc and location in the pit. Take a class. There are many great comp cooks out there that offer them. Review BBQtV you tube videos and listen to what the judges have to say for entries.


And there's a good answer :thumb:.

Cook ribs for friends and family. Use different sauces or rubs on each slab and find out which one they prefer most. Could do the same for chicken.

Tons of info on the net. Go to everyones blog you can find. You would be surprised at how much information you can get (comp info) because they want those people who try their blog recipes and techniques to be amazed, so many people will put comp recipes and techniques on their blogs. Great info! :eusa_clap

mwert
09-21-2011, 09:03 PM
And there's a good answer :thumb:.

Cook ribs for friends and family. Use different sauces or rubs on each slab and find out which one they prefer most. Could do the same for chicken.

Tons of info on the net. Go to everyones blog you can find. You would be surprised at how much information you can get (comp info) because they want those people who try their blog recipes and techniques to be amazed, so many people will put comp recipes and techniques on their blogs. Great info! :eusa_clap

Can you recommend certain blogs or perhaps how to find these said blogs?

Hub
09-22-2011, 06:30 AM
Consider taking a cooking class from one of the top teams. You can find the list at the KCBS website. Cost varies, but you'll gain an incredible perspecive on what it takes to achieve (1) the consistency required to win, and (2) some new "angles" on how a proven winner approaches his or her entries.

Last year I took Rod Gray's (Pellet Envy) class and loved it. It both confirmed some things I was already doing were right and taught me a bunch of new stuff I hadn't thought about.

watg?
09-22-2011, 07:17 AM
Your product needs to be super tender and moist. Flavors need to be classic barbecue with a nice balance of mild smoke, bold savory dry rub, very sweet glaze with a touch of tang or heat to balance it out. Professionally trimmed and neatly displayed in the box. Minimal garnish with the meat being the focus. If you can do this in all 4 categories on a consistent basis you will get lots of calls.

Originally Posted by Diva Q http://www.bbq-brethren.com/forum/images/buttons/viewpost.gif (http://www.bbq-brethren.com/forum/showthread.php?p=1795576#post1795576)
Practice . Then when you think you have practiced again practice more. When your family refuses to eat chicken move on to ribs and repeat for the 4 categories. Ask to try teams samples if possible that are better than you if you are at a ccomp. They may not share but you never know unless you ask. Listen to them when they speak. Take notes and have a good cooks log.Note time of day temperature and humidity levels. AS well as pit temps etc and location in the pit. Take a class. There are many great comp cooks out there that offer them. Review BBQtV you tube videos and listen to what the judges have to say for entries.



Wow, some really great info here from some folks that know about what they speak.:-D Don't forget to dig and explore the various forum archives, there is a ton of info located there as well.

Lake Dogs
09-22-2011, 07:40 AM
Someone once asked me "how do you make your money", and I replied "the old fashioned way, I print it".

Using that approach, for consistency I suggest competing in competitions with as few competitors as possible, preferably less than 11 total.

Sorry. Is it Friday yet?

HawgNationBBQ
09-22-2011, 09:18 AM
You might not like this answer, but the best thing to is practice.

Agreed and lots of it.

Podge
09-22-2011, 09:40 AM
Your product needs to be super tender and moist. Flavors need to be classic barbecue with a nice balance of mild smoke, bold savory dry rub, very sweet glaze with a touch of tang or heat to balance it out. Professionally trimmed and neatly displayed in the box. Minimal garnish with the meat being the focus. If you can do this in all 4 categories on a consistent basis you will get lots of calls.

Damn Chris ! You've perfectly summed up in one paragraph, the secret to doing well in BBQ contests. I don't think I've ever seen that before !

ique
09-22-2011, 09:55 AM
Damn Chris ! You've perfectly summed up in one paragraph, the secret to doing well in BBQ contests. I don't think I've ever seen that before !

Of course much easier said than done!

Ryan Chester
09-22-2011, 01:26 PM
Your product needs to be super tender and moist. Flavors need to be classic barbecue with a nice balance of mild smoke, bold savory dry rub, very sweet glaze with a touch of tang or heat to balance it out. Professionally trimmed and neatly displayed in the box. Minimal garnish with the meat being the focus. If you can do this in all 4 categories on a consistent basis you will get lots of calls.

Bingo!:thumb: ^^^^This man definitely knows how to win.