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Trollin
08-16-2011, 08:09 PM
Greetings all. I recently became a certified KCBS judge and will be judging my first contest soon. I apologize in advance if this question has been asked before and if so, maybe someone can post the thread...... Anyway, for you judges, what does each number 9, 8, 7, and so on represent for you personally? Meaning, do you give a 9 because you may pay for the rib you just tasted at a restaurant or a 6 because you see a lot of room for improvement???? I know the more I judge the better I'll be at what constitutes an 8 over a 7 and so on. I hope my question makes sense but if not, let me know and I'll try to explain.

I'm judging to get a taste (no pun) for what's out there in order to improve my bbq for future competitions. I've done some backyard comps and festivals, finising mid pack so there's room for improvement....

tigerpaw
08-16-2011, 08:46 PM
Greetings back and welcome! I am a first year judge though do not have a team or plan to compete. Only to do somewhat similar and enjoy as well as improve my own BBQ at home.

Your question is one that I think you will get as many varying answers to as there are ways to BBQ.

Myself, I was trained in a class and I do not recall ever being told one way or another on how to start. I will say this past weekend, several judges and I were sitting around and this topic came up - How do you start your scoring? Do you start at 9 and judge the item in front of you downward or do you start at 5 and adjust from there up or down.

My suggestion which I have found helpful is talk with contest rep when they have a chance. They will be running around with many things to do but offer to help them and then bend their ear for information. I also HIGHLY suggest looking for someone who is listed as a Master Judge and sit with them for a bit discussing their thoughts. Also after each presentation is judged, listen to those judges at your table. Make a mental note of how you scored the selections in front of you. They will begin comparing notes - mine was salty, too dry, too much sauce on it, fell apart (ribs/chicken), would not pull apart (brisket) etc. etc. etc. Offer your thoughts but let them talk and hear what they have to say.

I can tell you what you like, may not be what the other 5 like at your table. But then again that could be reversed as well. And it may be as simple as your piece of whatever was just plain bad. If so and you give it a low score, give the team the reason why. Fill out that comment card and turn it in Not that it was bad, but is was salty, it was overcooked and dry, it was over sauced outside but dry inside, my piece was burnt on bottom, etc. I had a piece of chicken this past weekend that nobody else at my table had so my score was WAY off from theirs. I filled out a card and turned it in so they at least knew why.

One wish I do have but does not happen is for KCBS to send back to new judges for say the first ten events, their scores in each category along with that of their table mates. I don’t need their names, just show me mine and theirs - Mine 978 The other five average 988 or even all 5 scores 988, 898, 889, 898, 999 , then I am near where I need to be. I need to improve how I judge TASTE. But if I am 978 and they are 867 or 786 then there are several issues I need to change. But we don’t get that feed back so have no real way of knowing where we are. So listen to those at your table and feed off that info.

Good luck and listen and learn as you go.

boogiesnap
08-16-2011, 08:48 PM
they didn't teach you that in class???:shocked:

6 is average.

go up or down from there.

QansasjayhawQ
08-16-2011, 08:51 PM
Hey there, Trollin - that's actually a very good question and not a troll . . . so why the name? In any case, welcome to the site and be sure to introduce yourself in Cattle Call.

I started judging for exactly the same reason(s) you give. In our first contest, our head cook thought we were going to walk away with it all. When we finished almost last in every category (except chicken where we finished 16th out of 60) I had the thought 'I wonder what it is that the judges are looking for?'.

And so I started the journey of becoming (the easy part) and learning how to judge (the long, difficult process).

To answer your question, I think that the official KCBS descriptions really do sum up the qualities of the entries - however, you will see after about ten events judged that '6 - Average' becomes more what you expect of the typical commercial BBQ chain restaurant . . . and it goes up from there - and down, of course.

9 excellent, 8 very good, 7 above average, 6 average, 5 below
average, 4 poor, 3 bad, and 2 inedible

I would have to say that the number of entries in a KCBS competition that are generally lower in quality than, say, Famous Dave's, are very low. Only entries that are raw and bloody or absolutely soaked in lighter fluid get a 2.

Other than that, I would say that the best restaurant bbq I've eaten would score a 6 overall.

BUT!!!! Here's an important distinction . . .

You are not comparing one entry against the other. You are deciding how well each entry achieves BBQ excellence. Guidelines for tenderness are provided in the CD that is played at the end of the judge's meeting.

You are also not comparing entries against commercial BBQ or against your dad's BBQ.

You really find yourself after several contests realizing that the important elements of taste are that all of the elements are in harmony. A well balanced symphony, jazz combo, rock band or country band, each can be pleasant to listen to. But if the drummer is playing too aggressively or the bass player doesn't know where the beat is, or the strings are squeaking . . . then the performance is less enjoyable.

So, really, an experienced KCBS judge is certainly capable of judging any style of BBQ . . . but whatever it is, it has to be well executed.

I hope this helps and I'm certain that many others will have their opinions . . . but that's been my experience, for what it's worth.

Have fun and I hope to see you on the BBQ judging circuit.

boogiesnap
08-16-2011, 08:53 PM
Greetings back and welcome! I am a first year judge though do not have a team or plan to compete. Only to do somewhat similar and enjoy as well as improve my own BBQ at home.

Your question is one that I think you will get as many varying answers to as there are ways to BBQ.

Myself, I was trained in a class and I do not recall ever being told one way or another on how to start. I will say this past weekend, several judges and I were sitting around and this topic came up - How do you start your scoring? Do you start at 9 and judge the item in front of you downward or do you start at 5 and adjust from there up or down.

My suggestion which I have found helpful is talk with contest rep when they have a chance. They will be running around with many things to do but offer to help them and then bend their ear for information. I also HIGHLY suggest looking for someone who is listed as a Master Judge and sit with them for a bit discussing their thoughts. Also after each presentation is judged, listen to those judges at your table. Make a mental note of how you scored the selections in front of you. They will begin comparing notes - mine was salty, too dry, too much sauce on it, fell apart (ribs/chicken), would not pull apart (brisket) etc. etc. etc. Offer your thoughts but let them talk and hear what they have to say.

I can tell you what you like, may not be what the other 5 like at your table. But then again that could be reversed as well. And it may be as simple as your piece of whatever was just plain bad. If so and you give it a low score, give the team the reason why. Fill out that comment card and turn it in Not that it was bad, but is was salty, it was overcooked and dry, it was over sauced outside but dry inside, my piece was burnt on bottom, etc. I had a piece of chicken this past weekend that nobody else at my table had so my score was WAY off from theirs. I filled out a card and turned it in so they at least knew why.

One wish I do have but does not happen is for KCBS to send back to new judges for say the first ten events, their scores in each category along with that of their table mates. I don’t need their names, just show me mine and theirs - Mine 978 The other five average 988 or even all 5 scores 988, 898, 889, 898, 999 , then I am near where I need to be. I need to improve how I judge TASTE. But if I am 978 and they are 867 or 786 then there are several issues I need to change. But we don’t get that feed back so have no real way of knowing where we are. So listen to those at your table and feed off that info.

Good luck and listen and learn as you go.

7 6 8 in taste isn't too far a swing over 3 judges.

669 or 996 then you may have something.

but taste is subjective. i suggest rethink your approach.

QansasjayhawQ
08-16-2011, 08:55 PM
Greetings back and welcome! I am a first year judge though do not have a team or plan to compete. Only to do somewhat similar and enjoy as well as improve my own BBQ at home.

Your question is one that I think you will get as many varying answers to as there are ways to BBQ.

Myself, I was trained in a class and I do not recall ever being told one way or another on how to start. I will say this past weekend, several judges and I were sitting around and this topic came up - How do you start your scoring? Do you start at 9 and judge the item in front of you downward or do you start at 5 and adjust from there up or down.

My suggestion which I have found helpful is talk with contest rep when they have a chance. They will be running around with many things to do but offer to help them and then bend their ear for information. I also HIGHLY suggest looking for someone who is listed as a Master Judge and sit with them for a bit discussing their thoughts. Also after each presentation is judged, listen to those judges at your table. Make a mental note of how you scored the selections in front of you. They will begin comparing notes - mine was salty, too dry, too much sauce on it, fell apart (ribs/chicken), would not pull apart (brisket) etc. etc. etc. Offer your thoughts but let them talk and hear what they have to say.

I can tell you what you like, may not be what the other 5 like at your table. But then again that could be reversed as well. And it may be as simple as your piece of whatever was just plain bad. If so and you give it a low score, give the team the reason why. Fill out that comment card and turn it in Not that it was bad, but is was salty, it was overcooked and dry, it was over sauced outside but dry inside, my piece was burnt on bottom, etc. I had a piece of chicken this past weekend that nobody else at my table had so my score was WAY off from theirs. I filled out a card and turned it in so they at least knew why.

One wish I do have but does not happen is for KCBS to send back to new judges for say the first ten events, their scores in each category along with that of their table mates. I don’t need their names, just show me mine and theirs - Mine 978 The other five average 988 or even all 5 scores 988, 898, 889, 898, 999 , then I am near where I need to be. I need to improve how I judge TASTE. But if I am 978 and they are 867 or 786 then there are several issues I need to change. But we don’t get that feed back so have no real way of knowing where we are. So listen to those at your table and feed off that info.

Good luck and listen and learn as you go.
Excellent advise!

Don't be afraid to speak up and ask questions of the other judges. There's a ton of experience and talent out there to take advantage of - but you must be brave and strike up a conversation.

boogiesnap
08-16-2011, 09:11 PM
Hey there, Trollin - that's actually a very good question and not a troll . . . so why the name? In any case, welcome to the site and be sure to introduce yourself in Cattle Call.

I started judging for exactly the same reason(s) you give. In our first contest, our head cook thought we were going to walk away with it all. When we finished almost last in every category (except chicken where we finished 16th out of 60) I had the thought 'I wonder what it is that the judges are looking for?'.

And so I started the journey of becoming (the easy part) and learning how to judge (the long, difficult process).

To answer your question, I think that the official KCBS descriptions really do sum up the qualities of the entries - however, you will see after about ten events judged that '6 - Average' becomes more what you expect of the typical commercial BBQ chain restaurant . . . and it goes up from there - and down, of course.

9 excellent, 8 very good, 7 above average, 6 average, 5 below
average, 4 poor, 3 bad, and 2 inedible

I would have to say that the number of entries in a KCBS competition that are generally lower in quality than, say, Famous Dave's, are very low. Only entries that are raw and bloody or absolutely soaked in lighter fluid get a 2.

Other than that, I would say that the best restaurant bbq I've eaten would score a 6 overall.

BUT!!!! Here's an important distinction . . .

You are not comparing one entry against the other. You are deciding how well each entry achieves BBQ excellence. Guidelines for tenderness are provided in the CD that is played at the end of the judge's meeting.

You are also not comparing entries against commercial BBQ or against your dad's BBQ.

You really find yourself after several contests realizing that the important elements of taste are that all of the elements are in harmony. A well balanced symphony, jazz combo, rock band or country band, each can be pleasant to listen to. But if the drummer is playing too aggressively or the bass player doesn't know where the beat is, or the strings are squeaking . . . then the performance is less enjoyable.

So, really, an experienced KCBS judge is certainly capable of judging any style of BBQ . . . but whatever it is, it has to be well executed.

I hope this helps and I'm certain that many others will have their opinions . . . but that's been my experience, for what it's worth.

Have fun and I hope to see you on the BBQ judging circuit.


agreed, my friend...

but the fact a CBJ has to ask that question here leaves me dumbfounded.

QansasjayhawQ
08-16-2011, 09:27 PM
agreed, my friend...

but the fact a CBJ has to ask that question here leaves me dumbfounded.
Yeah - <sigh> I know.

So many people think that, just because they take the judging class, they know what they're doing.

Fact is, I was lost for at least five contests . . . after which I started to get a clue . . . and it was ten contests before I actually felt a rhythm and familiarity to the process.

It was only after 15 events judged that I began to feel competent and it was 20 contests judged before I started feeling like I was giving each entry a fair shake.

BUT - Trollin's willingness to admit that he has no clue about where the judging starts - that's admirable in my book.

So many judges don't offer advice and are far too quiet in my opinion. That silence does nothing to help educate the new judges. I started sharing what I knew (admittedly not a lot in the beginning) after the first contest judged - just like tigerpaw did above. At the time, I knew it was a case of 'the blind leading the blind' but with each single contest, I did learn a little bit more. And I continue to learn more, even after having reached over 30 contests this year. I doubt that I (and I hope that I don't ever) reach a point where I 'know it all'. If I do, then I'll be no good as a judge anymore.

But what they tell you in judging class is merely a beginning reference point. Only a lot of experience can fill in the largely missing blanks.

boogiesnap
08-16-2011, 09:32 PM
i agree. there is no such thing as a stupid question.

but, does it take a master judge credentials like yours, to know how to judge.

no wonder number 6 always gives 5's.

QansasjayhawQ
08-16-2011, 09:50 PM
i agree. there is no such thing as a stupid question.

but, does it take a master judge credentials like yours, to know how to judge.

no wonder number 6 always gives 5's.
I don't have my master's yet - just got the test this week - and it's loaded with tough questions! (no, really!)

I think it takes at least ten contests for a new judge to really get within about a 20% variance from the other judges. So, if the master judge scores a 9 then the 10 event experienced judge can score as low as 7 without being silly.

I see the major problems with judges not knowing how to judge are those judges who may be experienced, but not very active. I've met several judges who judge only their hometown's event - once a year - for the last umpteen years! Those judges tend to score far more harshly than experienced, active judges.

Then, there are the 'celebrity' judges. Mayors, radio personalities, etc. They tend to score absolutely each entry a '9' and even ask to get their previous scores changed because 'this one is so much better than the one I just gave the top score to!'.

These two types of judges are the biggest problems with judges, in my opinion. Judges who ask good questions like Trollin' did are the people we want judging, in my opinion.

tigerpaw
08-16-2011, 09:59 PM
they didn't teach you that in class???:shocked:

6 is average.

go up or down from there.


The answer to that is NO. I even went back and looked at my notes as well as handouts. No where does it say start at 6 and work your way from there. I even went back through the red KCBS Offical Judges Certification booklet. Notta.

Also at least two Master Judges at two different events would also say thats not the right way to do it while two others say start at 9 and work down.

Can a brother get a consensus here?

As I pointed out, after the class, the best info I got was from other judges. Taling before the comp, talking between presentations, talking after the judging. Some stay around for the awards so some time there to kick back and discuss. I have yet to run into any judge at hotels on Friday nights but hope maybe can sit back and shoot the pork over some drinks.

Except for the bickering over some petty things, I have found every judge I have spoken with to be friendly, helpful, courteous and kind. Or was that the boy scout meeting? :heh:

QansasjayhawQ
08-16-2011, 10:13 PM
The answer to that is NO. I even went back and looked at my notes as well as handouts. No where does it say start at 6 and work your way from there. I even went back through the red KCBS Offical Judges Certification booklet. Notta.

Also at least two Master Judges at two different events would also say thats not the right way to do it while two others say start at 9 and work down.

Can a brother get a consensus here?

As I pointed out, after the class, the best info I got was from other judges. Taling before the comp, talking between presentations, talking after the judging. Some stay around for the awards so some time there to kick back and discuss. I have yet to run into any judge at hotels on Friday nights but hope maybe can sit back and shoot the pork over some drinks.

Except for the bickering over some petty things, I have found every judge I have spoken with to be friendly, helpful, courteous and kind. Or was that the boy scout meeting? :heh:
Yep - my experience is similar. Most judges are Trustworthy, Loyal, Helpful, Friendly, Courteous, Kind, Obedient, Cheerful, Thrifty, Brave, Clean, and Reverent.

Some almost too much! :-)

I believe the consensus is that there is no consensus. Don't start anywhere but with your own ideal of what excellence in BBQ means, take into account the hundreds of samples that have passed across your palate in the past, and remember that each sample you judge brings you closer to understanding what exactly excellence in bbq is.

In the mean time, discussing these things here on the brethren forums is the best we can do.

Gadragonfly
08-16-2011, 10:44 PM
The following isn't mine and there are those here who will recognize where this originated. I was given an OK to share it and its something that makes sense to me and may help a new judge get their bearing...

A 6 is something you could get at a decent bbq restaurant
A 7 is something you would want your friends to try
An 8 is something you'd want to share with your spouse
A 9 - you ain't sharing with anybody - get away from my plate :boxing:

Rookie'48
08-16-2011, 11:51 PM
I think that David (QansasjayhawQ) pretty much nailed all of the answers for you. I will add that for my first few contests I told my Table Captain that I was a brand new CBJ and asked if he would keep an eye on my scores compared to the other judges. I didn't want to be giving 6s if everyone else thought it was a 8 or 9 ( or vise-versa). Each of the TCs said that I was "in the ballpark" on my scoring, so that was all to the good.
You'll learn more about judging while talking "quietly" between catagories with your fellow judges than a dozen classes can teach you: "That second rib - all the flavor was in the sauce - where was the meat & rub flavor?" ....."Number 5 would have been better if he would have left out the mushy slices - the pulled & the chunks were great - it sure cost him for that" ..... "Man, that #4 chicken was one of the best I've ever had!" You'll hear all of these and more.
Another point that I can't make often enough is that you are NOT judging as to what you like, you're judging if the cook did a good job on the style that he was cooking. Was that sickenly sweet, candy-coated thigh done with a good flavor profile? Did it have "layers of flavors"? Did the sauce (if any) compliment the meat & the rub? If the answer is "yes" then I will give that entry 8s or 9s even though I'm not a real big fan of sweets. If it's served up with a mega-dose of chili powder & no other flavors, then he's gonna tank even though I'm somewhat of a pepper-head, because there was no ballance to it.
As David said, it takes a few comps to figure out what you're doing. And being able to ask questions is, to me, a sign that you will most likely be a very good, contientious, honest judge.
And we need judges like that.

Frankbbq
08-17-2011, 12:06 AM
The following isn't mine and there are those here who will recognize where this originated. I was given an OK to share it and its something that makes sense to me and may help a new judge get their bearing...

A 6 is something you could get at a decent bbq restaurant
A 7 is something you would want your friends to try
An 8 is something you'd want to share with your spouse
A 9 - you ain't sharing with anybody - get away from my plate :boxing:


Good Quote!
We used to start at 9 and worked down, then we started at 6 (average) and went from there.

AZScott
08-17-2011, 01:41 AM
As a competitor I view the scores a little differently since those scores directly affect where I will place. A 6 may be "average" but it will kill a teams chances of finishing well and the same could be said for a 7. Here's how I judge the scoring:

6 - Not very good and should finish at the back of the pack.
7 - Eh, not great but passable. The team should end up in the middle of the pack.
8 - Now we're talking and perhaps I'll eat the whole thing or this looks really nice. This team should be towards the top.
9 - Oh yea, this one really stands out and this team is worth of finishing in the top 5.

tigerpaw
08-17-2011, 05:54 AM
A 6 is something you could get at a decent bbq restaurant
A 7 is something you would want your friends to try
An 8 is something you'd want to share with your spouse
A 9 - you ain't sharing with anybody - get away from my plate

6 - Not very good and should finish at the back of the pack.
7 - Eh, not great but passable. The team should end up in the middle of the pack.
8 - Now we're talking and perhaps I'll eat the whole thing or this looks really nice. This team should be toward the top.
9 - Oh yea, this one really stands out and this team is worth of finishing in the top 5

One from a judge and one from a cook. (And neither from KCBS Judges Book.) Both good rules of thumb to go by but I can see as being totally different in the outcome of how someone would judge what is in front of them.

roksmith
08-17-2011, 06:11 AM
As a CBJ and as a cook, one of my pet peeves is when someone judging refers to, or treats the first score as a presentation score. Marking down for a slightly different colored piece of parsley or slightly different sized pieces of chicken.
It's an appearance score... It is the appearance of the meat that is so be judged, so unless that piece of mismatched chicken somehow makes the meat look less tasty, it should not be marked down for it.
Remember, while 9 is the top score, it does not necessarily represent a "perfect" score, but one that says you really want to dig in.

Just my 2 cents.

QansasjayhawQ
08-17-2011, 06:29 AM
As a CBJ and as a cook, one of my pet peeves is when someone judging refers to, or treats the first score as a presentation score. Marking down for a slightly different colored piece of parsley or slightly different sized pieces of chicken.
It's an appearance score... It is the appearance of the meat that is so be judged, so unless that piece of mismatched chicken somehow makes the meat look less tasty, it should not be marked down for it.
Remember, while 9 is the top score, it does not necessarily represent a "perfect" score, but one that says you really want to dig in.

Just my 2 cents.
On appearance, I agree. The more I go 'wow! I want to eat that!' when the entry is passed around for appearance scores, the higher I score it.

The slices can be different thicknesses, the thighs can all be different shades, etc. And who cares about the garnish being perfect?

The overall effect is what counts in appearance.

That being said, someone who takes those non-perfect details to the extreme probably won't do well because at some point it looks less appetizing.

Ron_L
08-17-2011, 06:30 AM
As a CBJ and as a cook, one of my pet peeves is when someone judging refers to, or treats the first score as a presentation score. Marking down for a slightly different colored piece of parsley or slightly different sized pieces of chicken.
It's an appearance score... It is the appearance of the meat that is so be judged, so unless that piece of mismatched chicken somehow makes the meat look less tasty, it should not be marked down for it.


Agreed...

If you want a real eye opener take a look at the Judge My Box section at BBQCritic.com (http://www.bbqcritic.com/judgemybox.html)

Somewhere in the comments on the rib boxes one CBJ said that he would mark a box down because the ribs were in the box with the pulled-back bone ends pointing towards the front of the box instead of the back of the box!

QansasjayhawQ
08-17-2011, 06:43 AM
Agreed...

If you want a real eye opener take a look at the Judge My Box section at BBQCritic.com (http://www.bbqcritic.com/judgemybox.html)

Somewhere in the comments on the rib boxes one CBJ said that he would mark a box down because the ribs were in the box with the pulled-back bone ends pointing towards the front of the box instead of the back of the box!
Now that's silly. If someone has cooked a perfect set of ribs, one of the things that makes it look more appetizing to me is if I take a look at that pulled-back bone end and go 'wow! those look they are done just right!' . . . making them more appetizing to me.

That CBJ was probably not experienced or active. An 'armchair' CBJ I guess. Anyway - not all CBJ's would do that.

Ron_L
08-17-2011, 07:02 AM
That CBJ was probably not experienced or active. An 'armchair' CBJ I guess.

I don't have time to dig up the comment right now, but I think he was a Master Judge :shocked:


Anyway - not all CBJ's would do that.

And to me that's the real problem :-D If all CBJs did it (or things like this) at least it would be consistent.

bbq.tom
08-17-2011, 08:06 AM
In KCBS judging each entry is to stand on its own and NOT be compared to ANYTHING you have previously experienced - either that day or EVER in your life. Therefore, you are to taste each piece as if that were the only piece being judged and score it accordingly. (MBN is different on this issue, but you are talking KCBS)

I basically use the following scale in judging KCBS events:
6 - Average Q for restaurants and home cooking (slightly below average for competition)
7 - Average Q for competitions (above average Q found elsewhere)
8 - Pretty darn good Q, but deficient in something
9 - GREAT Q and something I want for breakfast, lunch AND dinner!

However you score each entry, PLEASE make sure you use COMMENT CARDS!!! I definitely use them for any scores of 6 or below, and try to use them on 7s unless there just isn't enough time between rounds.

The best way to tell if you are "in the ballpark" is to discuss each category immediately after that category finishes. Ask your Table Captain how you compared with the other judges and ask the other judges for their comments on each entry.
LISTEN and take heed to what they are saying and this will help you understand not only others opinions, but also what they are looking for and how they responded to it.

You won't become an expert judge just by judging many events. Experience will help, but only if you are open to learning from those around you.

Good luck and I hope to sit with you at a judges table some day!

QansasjayhawQ
08-17-2011, 10:21 AM
I don't have time to dig up the comment right now, but I think he was a Master Judge :shocked:

And to me that's the real problem :-D If all CBJs did it (or things like this) at least it would be consistent.
Well, that's what you get when you use human beings to judge, I suppose.

Some judges have that 'I'm here to PUNISH!' attitude. In my opinion, that's not a helpful attitude.

We are BBQ judges, not BBQ critics!

boogiesnap
08-17-2011, 10:32 AM
in my limited experience with the judges, however each one approached scoring, has been very accurate.

when my food stank, the scores reflected it. and when it was good, they rewarded it.

i knew each time what i was sending to them and they scored it accordingly.

while it would seem there should be some direction given at the class as to approach, the group(judges)as a whole seem to work it out on their own get it right anyway.

TooSaucedToPork
08-17-2011, 10:37 AM
This is how I explain it to my team and to people at contests that are not judges...

Rating scale in easy to understand terms

1 - is only given in a DQ situation
2 - absolutely inedible – you hand it to the dog
3 - edible
4 - from a tv dinner
5 - you get at a chain restaurant
6 - good bbq restaurant
7 - you would want to call your buddies over to try
8 - to call your wife/husband about / blog about
9 – You would trade your wife/husband in for this – this is amazing!

IN DIFFERENT TERMS

4 – Horrible, Inedible, Gives you that little shutter when you know something is wrong
5 – Bland, Unappetizing, My 5 year old could do better
6 – OK, Something off about the flavor blend, you feel yourself get a confused look when its presented
7 - Not great but GOOD, Flavors blend well, gives you a happy feeling, MAKES YOU SMILE
8 – Great!, Makes you close your eyes and savor the happiness, beautiful appearance.
9 – Amazing, Breathtaking, Awe Inspiring, Makes me Salivate looking at it, you dream about things this good – This is THE PERFECT TURN IN


Neil

Trollin
08-17-2011, 08:30 PM
A big thanks to everyone for your "two cents worth"... The name Trollin is what I chose because I frequent a few hunting forums and brought it with me. Trollin is what a buck does when he's scent checking his scrape line....

I have a pretty good idea of how to critique bbq from what I learned in class but I knew there were MANY professionals here that I could rely on to fine tune things for me and anyone else that may want to know but hasn't asked.

I will be sure an pay attention and ask plenty of questions as many suggest. Mainly listen and take it all in. I want to be as fair as I can to those that work so hard all week long to produce what they consider awesome que. Yes, it doesn't all come together in just one day. It takes all week....

Thanks again and if anyone is judging the Roots and blues and BBQ in Columbia MO on Sept 10, I'll be there ready to judge and learn.