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hammerz_nailz
06-04-2011, 06:54 AM
I am going to try this recipe for an overnight cook tonight.

http://www.foodnetwork.com/recipes/alton-brown/pulled-pork-recipe/index.html

Have any of you guys ever tried it?

Do you think its ok to substitute kosher salt for pickling salt?
I couldn't find pickling salt in the store.

Also I don't have a scale and it calls for 12 oz. of salt so is that about 1 cup?

Alba Gu Brath
06-04-2011, 07:14 AM
I am going to try this recipe for an overnight cook tonight.

http://www.foodnetwork.com/recipes/alton-brown/pulled-pork-recipe/index.html

Have any of you guys ever tried it?

Do you think its ok to substitute kosher salt for pickling salt?
I couldn't find pickling salt in the store.

Also I don't have a scale and it calls for 12 oz. of salt so is that about 1 cup? Take your Kosher salt and pulse it through the Food Processor or spice grinder until it is reduced to about half its volume and you'll have roughly the same size grain as the pickling salt . Might try looking in the canning section of the GS for canning salt too... IIRC canning and pickling salt are sans the iodine possible the Kosher too ( can't remember ). Might be good to swing by Office depot and pick up a postage scale on the cheap as the volume of the Kosher salt as it is presented in out of the box form is different than that of the salt AB uses in the episode. Good Luck Brother.

Mitch
06-04-2011, 07:15 AM
It will be fine. You just need to use an extra 2 Tablespoons of salt per cup of salt to equal the amount of pickeling salt (canning salt). Pickleing salt is just like kosher except pickleeing salt is ground a little finer. Here is a link. http://whatscookingamerica.net/Q-A/salt.htm

Next time you are at the store, look where they keep the canning supplies (mason jars). Canning?pickleing salt isn't usually kept where the "regular" salt and is kept.

Mister Bob
06-04-2011, 07:27 AM
Pickling salt dissolves well in cold water, contains no iodine or anti-caking agents, and is excellent for use in brines. Kosher salt also dissolves fairly well in cold water and also does not contain iodine, but many brands do contain yellow prussiate of soda, an anti-caking agent. Unlike the anti-caking additive in table salt, however, it doesn't cloud pickling liquids.

Keep in mind however, pickling salt has the consistency of table salt, and weighs more per cup or fluid ounce that Kosher salt. This is not as important in brines as it is in pickling or some other recipes, but to compensate, a good rule of thumb is one cup plus two tablespoons of Kosher salt will be equivalent to one cup of pickling salt (or table salt) in a recipe. If your recipe is measured by weight instead of volume, straight substitution is fine.

If you want to substitute table salt (non iodized please!) you can, but because it doesn't dissolve as well, it would be better to add it to hot water, then cool the brine before using. Good luck with your cook!

ssbbqguy
06-04-2011, 10:30 AM
I was on a molasses-brine for awhile. Flavor didn't soak into product unless it was in for a long time, at least overnite.Has a very distinct flavor, reason why I stopped using, that tasted ok but not great. Regardless of what I used for seasoning, the molassses always overpowered. Tried all types and strentghs, still the same. With everyone's tastes different, you may love it. Just try and see. I went back to heavy injections of tasty goodies. Works better for me. Good luck. Steve.

expatpig
06-04-2011, 10:39 AM
I may be off base here, but why do you need to inject or brine a butt? It has enough fat in it to keep it moist, and what's wrong with pork tasting like....well, pork?

purplestarrider
06-04-2011, 10:53 AM
you can go to harbor frieght and pick up a scale for cheap. http://www.harborfreight.com/digital-scale-95364.html I have this one. they have a cheaper on that would work as well but it doesn't have the power cord it comes with batters and this one comes with cord but can use batteries. Just my personal preferrence. as far as the pickling salt as everyone else has said check the canning section. Especially this time of year.

As far as the brine itsself i haven't tried it but i saw the episode and it looked good and i am looking forward to hearing how it goes for you.

Thirsty4Q
06-04-2011, 12:04 PM
I have used this brine many times, and as a matter of fact have 2 butts in the cooler right now getting a 24 hour soak. They will get rinsed dried and rubbed tonight, going on the smoke at about midnight.

I also want to note if this is your first time with this to make sure you rinse the pork very well, to get as much of the brine off as possible, dry really well, and I like to refigerate for a couple hours uncovered to dehydrate a bit ensuring a nice dry meat before I rub.

mwmac
06-04-2011, 12:11 PM
I have tried Alton's pork butt brine but find that the family prefers the Chris Lilly recipe for pulled shoulder.:thumb:

Bonewagon
06-04-2011, 12:16 PM
I've done the AB brine and liked it well enough. But I've quit doing it just because I don't often have the extra time required.

Bonewagon
06-04-2011, 12:18 PM
I may be off base here, but why do you need to inject or brine a butt? It has enough fat in it to keep it moist, and what's wrong with pork tasting like....well, pork?

You don't need to brine or inject a butt. It's just another way to add to the flavor profile imho.

Bob Wiley
06-04-2011, 12:54 PM
I may be off base here, but why do you need to inject or brine a butt? It has enough fat in it to keep it moist, and what's wrong with pork tasting like....well, pork?

I'll take natural any day. Never tasted an injected or brined butt I liked.

Different strokes I guess.

hammerz_nailz
06-04-2011, 03:13 PM
I don't usually brine pork shoulder but this recipe has great reviews and decided to try something new.

I ended up getting a scale at Walmart this morning but no luck with pickling/canning salt anywhere. I used kosher salt.

Going to try the BBQ sauce that was on this episode too.

I think this is it:

SWEET PICKLE BARBEQUE SAUCE
Yield: 2-3 cups
Ingredients
2 slices bacon
1 med onion fine chopped
1 clove garlic minced
1 cup ketchup 250 ml
1 cup sweet mixed pickle juice 250 ml
1 cup dark ale (sweet & smoky or lager (lighter 250 ml
4 tbsp brown sugar 60 ml
2 tbsp lemon juice 30 ml
1 tsp lemon zest 5 ml
1 tsp dry mustard 5 ml
Tabasco to taste

Steps
Cook bacon over medium heat until crisp. Remove from the pan and discard (LOL.
Add the onion and garlic and cook for 10 minutes on medium, stirring often.
Add remaining ingredients and increase the temperature to medium-high.
When the sauce starts to boil turn down the heat to medium.
Simmer for 20 minutes stirring the sauce frequently to avoid burning.
Notes
Remove from heat and allow to cool in the pan. Store in a covered container in the fridge for up to 2 weeks.

cookingdude555
06-04-2011, 04:29 PM
I did it a few years ago. I remember it was pretty dang good. I cooked it on the old wsm.

ssbbqguy
06-04-2011, 06:08 PM
In contests is where my pork butts jiggle like jello because they have so much enhancement loaded in to replace most of the fat with additional flavors and moisture. What's done for comps. isn't usually done for home or volume cooks.Most contest food is there to impress overwhelmingly in one or two bites and one might not want to eat a plate full. This past two weeks I was lucky enough to pitch in cooking the most pork that's been cooked around this area, at once in a parking lot. Not only were we not trimming fat caps or injecting any of them, just checking for bone chips and rubbing, then smoking. Some mighty fine pork was served that way. After pulling, used a drill for speed, lightly dusted with rub and light sauce, some happy eaters. I'm sure that starting off with a great product and the smokers had a large part of the sucess. Steve.

BBQBobofA2
06-04-2011, 06:32 PM
I made this exact recipe last weekend with results like most of the above comments - it was good, but not as flavorful as I expected. We had a change in plans so it brined for about 20 hours (drained most of it after 12), but still it was not salty and frankly not that flavorful with the rub. I made two shoulders that weekend, one with the AB and the other with a chili powder heavy rub, the family liked the later better.

El Ropo
06-04-2011, 06:35 PM
Unless I was planning on making buckboard bacon, I'd never want to intentionally cure my pork before smoking. A brine is OK for poultry, but for pork roast, I'd think it would just turn into uncooked, cured buckboard bacon.

My rules for pork are never let raw pork sit in a sodium solution before cooking unless you just love ham. Even when doing a simple rub, I apply the rub just before tossing on the cooker.

Is hammy tasting pork really that appealing?

RedRyderBBQ
06-04-2011, 07:12 PM
I used Alton's brine, and while it doesn't impart any additional flavor, I think the added moisture is well worth it. I like the brine but am going to try injecting tomorrow and see what works better. But I prefer a brined over the "natural" pork. Its not really natural since pork has been engineered and bred to be lower in fat, so whats natural anymore....

expatpig
06-04-2011, 08:55 PM
95% of the pork that you are buying is brined for you, or as the Pork producers say"enhanced".

LT72884
06-04-2011, 09:34 PM
i do this method all the time. I let the salt stay on the meat for at least an hour. I have had EXCELLENT success with this. I use plain kosher salt. I then also put minced garlic and pepper on it. mm mm good

EDIT

DANG IT. this was supposed to be on the steak thread. Sorry. ignore this post please. I had to many windows open on my browser so i posted in the wrong one. haha

El Ropo
06-05-2011, 07:24 AM
95% of the pork that you are buying is brined for you, or as the Pork producers say"enhanced".

There is more non-enhnaced pork around here than there is enhanced. Might be a regional thing.

RedRyderBBQ
06-05-2011, 08:24 AM
There is more non-enhnaced pork around here than there is enhanced. Might be a regional thing.

Agreed. I have never seen enhanced cyro pork butts. I almost always use the Cryos from sams. Im smoking a butt right now and read over the whole package it saw no signs of saying it was enhanced. I think that regardless of what I was cooking I would never buy meat that said enhanced on it, just need to read what you're buying.

bassbuster33
06-05-2011, 08:41 AM
95% of the pork that you are buying is brined for you, or as the Pork producers say"enhanced".

We make it a point to avoid enhanced pork. We buys ribs, butts and whole loins in cryovac with no enhancement. We then break down the whole loin into roasts and chops and freeze.

jalon
06-05-2011, 08:49 AM
ssbbqguy, how did you use a drill for speed? newbie here, that one threw me a curve ball...just woke up...

Jalon

Bob Wiley
06-05-2011, 11:12 AM
95% of the pork that you are buying is brined for you, or as the Pork producers say"enhanced".


Is that a Canadian thing?

Certainly not the case down here.

Warthog
06-06-2011, 08:19 AM
95% of the pork that you are buying is brined for you, or as the Pork producers say"enhanced".

I tend to disagree. I never have seen or purchased a Boston butt that was enhanced. Just noticed your from Texas. I thought you guys only believe in beef. Was in the Dallas area several years ago, Went to a restaurant there and they had great beef ribs.