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View Full Version : Be Careful Making UDS!/Student killed building barbeque


Cris
05-26-2011, 06:02 PM
Serious consequences for local high school kids making barbeques at school.

http://www.ottawacitizen.com/news/Student+critically+injured+blast+rocks+Ottawa+high +school/4843671/story.html

I know that folks on this board are aware of most of the dangers associated with torches and welding, this unfortunate accident reminds us of something else to consider, the fumes from an empty barrel can be enough to ignite an explosion.

Several threads have been merged into this thread.

Phubar
05-26-2011, 06:07 PM
Always check your barrels.....check!
Thanks for pointing that out!

Midnight Smoke
05-26-2011, 06:09 PM
I hope the kid/s come out okay. It sounds to me like they need a new Shop Teacher.

Soybomb
05-26-2011, 06:11 PM
Poor kid :(

ozlites
05-26-2011, 08:11 PM
That sucks, that's in my hometown.:sad:

jestridge
05-26-2011, 09:19 PM
That is a question on our safety test. But we don't cut barrels in my shop no matter what. If I do cut one I make sure the students are gone.

brickie
05-26-2011, 09:27 PM
Actually article say he passed away..It is sad.

brickie

JONESY
05-26-2011, 09:43 PM
Makes a full recovery??? The kid died. That shop teacher should face criminal charges.

expatpig
05-27-2011, 08:42 AM
An 18 year old student was fatally injured yesterday in Ottawa, On. in his high school auto shop while attempting to build a barbecue. He was cutting a 55 gal drum that previously contained peppermint oil when it exploded, killing the student and injuring 5 others. Let's all be careful out there! thechronicleherald.ca/canada/1245486.html

PTSidehow
05-27-2011, 08:58 AM
Here is a link to a news story about a high school shop class making BBQ's out of drums and cutting same.

They were using MT peppermint oil drum. Peppermint oil is not only flammable but will generate heavier than air explosive vapours when heated only slightly. It is also allergenic and produces toxic fumes if burnt.

Sadly the latest news is the student didn't make it.

http://www.news1130.com/news/national/article/232110--student-gravely-hurt-after-explosion-at-ottawa-high-school

When cutting any closed container you can do the following which, I have come to believe to be a safe and inexpensive method.
Put a couple of pounds of dry ice in the drum and wait 15 minutes. Cut away. As safe as it gets with no other problems. If you fill it with water you have to dispose of the water afterwards as hazardous waste.
:thumb:

Arlin_MacRae
05-27-2011, 09:17 AM
That's sad. Thanks for sharing.

CarolinaQue
05-27-2011, 09:45 AM
That is very sad. The really horrible thing is that this was avaoidable and his shop teacher should have known better!!!

expatpig
05-27-2011, 09:50 AM
Don't know all of the specifics, Canadians are reluctant to share any details of a fatality, but they have been building them regularly in their shop class.

Rubmybutt
05-27-2011, 10:09 AM
Should have been better ventilated, I believe if you run a pipe from your car exhaust into the drum it will neutralize any vapors that may explode.

Don't quote me on this but I think this is right, still very sad.

vhram
05-27-2011, 10:16 AM
Thats really sad and didnot have to happen. Where was the shop teacher?

PTSidehow
05-27-2011, 10:16 AM
How many on this forum knew how volatile peppermint oil is! I didn't realize that it was as volatile and dangerous as it is. I knew that when the word oil is used in a description that it is more than not a flammable substance!. See my post on the matter from earlier to find out the other problems with peppermint oil.

http://www.bbq-brethren.com/forum/showthread.php?t=107427

By the other information from the students and other sources the teacher was very safety aware. But it only takes a short time and one student taking a short cut whether it is by their own thought or from other students. That a catastrophic event happens.

Having spent 35 years in a large urban school system. You really don't know till you have walked a mile in a shop coat. And that is just the normal accidents, not the drug induced or stupid human tricks the kids try to do, copying TV/videos/movies.
Also the best method for making a drum safe to cut is explained.

expatpig
05-27-2011, 10:20 AM
The shop teacher and four other students were also injured.

CarolinaQue
05-27-2011, 10:41 AM
How many on this forum knew how volatile peppermint oil is! I didn't realize that it was as volatile and dangerous as it is. I knew that when the word oil is used in a description that it is more than not a flammable substance!. See my post on the matter from earlier to find out the other problems with peppermint oil.

http://www.bbq-brethren.com/forum/showthread.php?t=107427

By the other information from the students and other sources the teacher was very safety aware. But it only takes a short time and one student taking a short cut whether it is by their own thought or from other students. That a catastrophic event happens.

Having spent 35 years in a large urban school system. You really don't know till you have walked a mile in a shop coat. And that is just the normal accidents, not the drug induced or stupid human tricks the kids try to do, copying TV/videos/movies.
Also the best method for making a drum safe to cut is explained.


An MSDS can be very helpful before starting a project!

BamaRambler
05-27-2011, 11:21 AM
Sad news and a senior at that. Sympathy to the family and friends of the kid.

The artical says the drum the boy was sawing on contained peppermint oil and its fumes can be explosive when mixed with air.
Is this true?

jestridge
05-27-2011, 11:39 AM
The best action to take no barrel allow to be cut in shop. That my rules. Also it easy to stand on the side line and second guess the instructor. You never lived until you have a room full of student in a shop with dangerous equiptment.

enasnidx
05-27-2011, 11:41 AM
Very sad and scary. Sympathies to the family and friends. This is an eye opening article. I have not built my UDS yet, but this sure brings attention to something that I hadn't thought about. I plan to use a reconditioned barrel (burned, blasted and repainted) anyway, but had I found a used barrel who knows?

CarolinaQue
05-27-2011, 12:47 PM
The best action to take no barrel allow to be cut in shop. That my rules. Also it easy to stand on the side line and second guess the instructor. You never lived until you have a room full of student in a shop with dangerous equiptment.


I've been that guy. Taught welding a metal fabrication for the Coast Guard. I'm just scratching my head as to why those barrels were even authorized to be used for said application? I'd rather take a chance with a 30W oil barrel than that stuff any day!!!

OakPit
05-27-2011, 12:52 PM
Really Sad. Where was the teach?

jestridge
05-27-2011, 12:53 PM
I suppose the thinking they was a food grade barrel and wasn't dangerous

landarc
05-27-2011, 12:58 PM
There are processes for cutting on tanks with flammable or explosive residue, to avoid a tragedy like this. I used to cut on gas tanks and other types of tanks that held flammable or explosive materials. Ventilation, flooding and other techniques are important. On the other hand, I have ignored those very rules when they were inconvenient.

Yes, a MSDS would have helped, but, can any of us honestly say that we always follow every safety rule every time? It is a terrible tragedy for a young man's family.

CarolinaQue
05-27-2011, 01:40 PM
There are processes for cutting on tanks with flammable or explosive residue, to avoid a tragedy like this. I used to cut on gas tanks and other types of tanks that held flammable or explosive materials. Ventilation, flooding and other techniques are important. On the other hand, I have ignored those very rules when they were inconvenient.

Yes, a MSDS would have helped, but, can any of us honestly say that we always follow every safety rule every time? It is a terrible tragedy for a young man's family.



Ummmm...when it comes to some thing that can blow up and kill me...yes!!!

landarc
05-27-2011, 01:52 PM
Really? Never driven a little tipsy, never rode a motorcycle without a helmet, never driven without a safety belt? I have spent years working on a flower nursery and construction sites, the rules have always been treated more as guidelines. Perhaps that is why my body has been destroyed, but, I am not ready to condemn the teacher or the student, it was a terrible accident. I would not have checked the MSDS before cutting on the barrel. I probably would have ventilated the drum, either by flooding the interior with air, or using a mechanical drum head remover, but I am an old man now.

CarolinaQue
05-27-2011, 02:24 PM
Really? Never driven a little tipsy, never rode a motorcycle without a helmet, never driven without a safety belt? I have spent years working on a flower nursery and construction sites, the rules have always been treated more as guidelines. Perhaps that is why my body has been destroyed, but, I am not ready to condemn the teacher or the student, it was a terrible accident. I would not have checked the MSDS before cutting on the barrel. I probably would have ventilated the drum, either by flooding the interior with air, or using a mechanical drum head remover, but I am an old man now.


I understand what you are saying, however, a teacher is suppose to be the one acting as the safety observer and thinking about the things that the young kid that thinks they are Superman isn't. You may not have thought to take those proper safety measures, but would you if you were teaching your kid how to do something potentially dangerous?

huaco
05-27-2011, 02:33 PM
Me and a welder up here at work just built my first UDS this morning. I saw this story just prior to going out and starting.
What we did was this - open the bung and fill that puppy up with water and then let it run for a while to evacuate what floated to the top.
In my case, it was high grade Kerosene. He dumped the water and started cutting off the closed head. I told him about the poor kid that was killed. So sad...

landarc
05-27-2011, 02:37 PM
Yes, when I have taught or mentored young people, I do take the extra effort and care to make sure I teach them well. I am teaching my nephew how to play baseball, at 14, he is doing quite well. Much of what I teach him now is how not to damage his body like I did. I hope he takes the lessons better than I did. I recently taught a friend to shoot, I spend 2 hours going over safety procedures and processes and made him meet my expectations prior to handing him a gun and live rounds. It just makes sense.

I am just saying, for instance, I had great teachers in chemistry in high school, they taught me well, and I was a honor student trustee with access to the chemical locker. That is, up until I blew up a sink and counter with an accidental acid bomb. A teacher can't be everywhere.

CarolinaQue
05-27-2011, 02:48 PM
As I previously states, I don't understand why they were using a drum that had that material in it in the first place? That is what I have an issue with. I understand all to well that a teacher can't be every where at once, but a drum that held such a volatile substance shouldn't be used in a high school shop class to be cut on unless the person doing the cutting was an adult that has had some experience with it before.

landarc
05-27-2011, 02:52 PM
I do agree with that CQ.

CarolinaQue
05-27-2011, 02:57 PM
I do agree with that CQ.


Glad we found some common ground!:thumb: