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altomari8868
04-18-2011, 02:02 PM
Hi all, my question is with burnt ends for the competitions. I pull my brisket at around 190 to 200 degree depending on feel. I foil it and place into a cooler till before turn in. My question has 2 parts.

If it is done 3 hours before turn in do you seperate the point from the flat at this time. Then foil it and place in the cooler. I ask the first question because I am thinking of including burnt ends with my next box.
If you do burnt ends in with slices have you found it successful.
Any help would be huge.... Thanks in advance.

CBQ
04-18-2011, 02:36 PM
You may not want brisket advice from me after seeing my Lexington finish :icon_blush: but ya, split 'em, hold the flat, and toss the point back on the smoker. We have found including burnt ends helpful, but as always if something comes out badly don't include it. You can even turn in only the point if the flat didn't come out well.

ammoore
04-18-2011, 03:46 PM
agree ^^^^^^
I seperate mine at 160 and cut up the burnt ends.....reseason......a little sauce and foil them up until they are sticky icky and super tender.
but that's just me.

Rookie'48
04-18-2011, 05:34 PM
... but as always if something comes out badly don't include it ...

This just might be the single most important piece of advice that you'll ever get. I can't count how many times the flat was great but the point wasn't or vice versa. Or the pulled pork was great & the sliced was mushy, etc. If you put it in the box it WILL get judged, for better or worse.

Arlin_MacRae
04-18-2011, 05:40 PM
This just might be the single most important piece of advice that you'll ever get. I can't count how many times the flat was great but the point wasn't or vice versa. Or the pulled pork was great & the sliced was mushy, etc. If you put it in the box it WILL get judged, for better or worse.

More from the new judge: I had a brisket sample in front of me last weekend that consisted of slices and burnt ends. The slice was great and the delectably candied burnt end was...tasteless. Uh, what? I probably did a double take. And I had to mark the overall turn-in down because of the burnt end.

My fledgling advice is this: TASTE what you're turning in before putting it in the box. Their extra chunks of burnt ends hurt them on my score sheet...

Divemaster
04-21-2011, 12:46 PM
We actually split the brisket prior to cooking so we always have a chance to make BE's...

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Jacked UP BBQ
04-21-2011, 03:17 PM
Never split a brisket NEVER!

YankeeBBQ
04-21-2011, 03:24 PM
Never split a brisket NEVER!

Me either. I do cube up the point and put some in the box. I don't know if they're burnt ends but that cubed up point sure does taste good.

Sawdustguy
04-21-2011, 03:56 PM
That make three of us, but what the heck do we know, we're Polocks.:wink:

Sledneck
04-21-2011, 04:19 PM
make sure you put some A-1 on those burnt ends

Butcher BBQ
04-21-2011, 04:20 PM
I'm just a sliced guy. Can't ever trust the ends so go with what taste good.

Divemaster
04-22-2011, 12:32 PM
Never split a brisket NEVER!

I don't know, we've done very well by splitting them.

You do what you want, I'll keep walking with mine.

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altomari8868
04-22-2011, 01:13 PM
Ball park cook time once you split them?

Jacked UP BBQ
04-22-2011, 01:17 PM
I don't know, we've done very well by splitting them.

You do what you want, I'll keep walking with mine.

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You take walks with your brisket? Thats weird, do you use a leash?! Anyway why split and release juices????? If trimed correctly splitting a brisket is a waste of time and lost juices. IMO

Born2Smoke
04-22-2011, 02:01 PM
You take walks with your brisket? Thats weird, do you use a leash?! Anyway why split and release juices????? If trimed correctly splitting a brisket is a waste of time and lost juices. IMO

I agree with Matt 100%. When you split a brisket, you release juices that you are trying to maintain in the flat. As meat cooks, the muscles tighten and squeeze juices to the outer edges of the meat while sometimes extracting them. This is why we get pan drippings when roasting large meats and also why we rest meat after cooking. By cutting into the meat, these juices rush out and end up on your cutting board. Unless you plan on turning in your cutting board, I say leave the flat and point connected until your brisket is fully rested at least 30 minutes.

Jorge
04-22-2011, 02:11 PM
You take walks with your brisket? Thats weird, do you use a leash?! Anyway why split and release juices????? If trimed correctly splitting a brisket is a waste of time and lost juices. IMO

Both methods can work. It depends on the skill of the cook, the exact method, and many other factors.

EDIT: I'm not saying that one method is easier or more difficult than the other:) Personally, I prefer a compromise that doesn't require me to watch 4 pieces of meat instead of 2.

Divemaster
04-22-2011, 02:25 PM
Both methods can work. It depends on the skill of the cook, the exact method, and many other factors.

Thank you.

I have had no problems keeping the flat juicy, tender and full of flavor.

Also by splitting, I'm able to get not only seasoning all around both the flat and the point, but also smoke flavor.



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Divemaster
04-22-2011, 02:28 PM
Ball park cook time once you split them?

Depends on the temp. For us, about 7 hours plus cooler time.

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bbqbull
04-22-2011, 02:31 PM
I tried some of Divemaster's burnt ends at a contest a couple years ago.
Melted in your mouth, thanks Jeff.

Divemaster
04-22-2011, 02:43 PM
After re-reading the thread I think there may be a miss understanding. I split my briskets prior to cooking, not after.

Sorry for any confusion.

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huminie
04-22-2011, 02:45 PM
I agree with Matt 100%. When you split a brisket, you release juices that you are trying to maintain in the flat. As meat cooks, the muscles tighten and squeeze juices to the outer edges of the meat while sometimes extracting them. This is why we get pan drippings when roasting large meats and also why we rest meat after cooking. By cutting into the meat, these juices rush out and end up on your cutting board. Unless you plan on turning in your cutting board, I say leave the flat and point connected until your brisket is fully rested at least 30 minutes.


This is quite misleading. When you separate the point from the flat you are not "cutting into the meat". The point and flat are two separate muscles separated by a layer of fat. As long as you are careful you can separate the two of them without actually cutting into any meat at all.

I personally like to cook them together and then separate prior to foiling. This ensures the flat stays moist and allows it to cook up to a perfect tenderness at the end of the cook.

chambersuac
04-22-2011, 02:49 PM
I've had Jeff's brisket slices and burnt ends. Both are excellent. I just hope that I can turn in a brisket that is as good as his - or my son's, for that matter :)

That being said, I have not, yet, split a brisket...of course, I've only tried burnt ends once or twice. Next one I cook, I'll split. Jeff, what's your recipe for brisket, again??? ;)

Jacked UP BBQ
04-22-2011, 03:00 PM
Divemaster - prior too cooking is a different thing. So yes prior IMO is ok. I thought you split in the middle of cook. I do know guys that do it both ways and do well. I just choose not to.

Huminie - that is not misleading at all. Split a brisket after it is cooked and still hot and tell me what happens. Juices every that were inside the entire roast. I know they are two different pieces but if cooked whole, they share juices and will release by parting them.

Divemaster
04-22-2011, 03:01 PM
Jeff, what's your recipe for brisket, again??? ;)

Not a probem...

Split it, season it, cook it...

It's that easy... lol


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huminie
04-22-2011, 03:04 PM
Divemaster - prior too cooking is a different thing. So yes prior IMO is ok. I thought you split in the middle of cook. I do know guys that do it both ways and do well. I just choose not to.

Huminie - that is not misleading at all. Split a brisket after it is cooked and still hot and tell me what happens. Juices every that were inside the entire roast. I know they are two different pieces but if cooked whole, they share juices and will release by parting them.

I do it all the time and never lose the juices from inside the meat.

Divemaster
04-22-2011, 03:05 PM
Divemaster - prior too cooking is a different thing. So yes prior IMO is ok. I thought you split in the middle of cook. I do know guys that do it both ways and do well. I just choose not to

No harm, no foul.

FYI, Johnny Trigg is one who splits towards the end of his cook... At least he used to, I have no idea what he is doing this year.


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