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PigTamer
03-08-2011, 08:00 PM
I have an itch to start competetion and I have 2 UDS's. Is it possible? Does anyone compete using UDS or should I look at getting a WSM before I jump in? Any Advice would be greatly appreciated.

Rich Parker
03-08-2011, 08:10 PM
You could easily cook a comp on two drums!

I cook everything on two drums and use a an older wsm for the chicken.

swamprb
03-08-2011, 08:18 PM
I cooked on drums when I first started out. I miss cooking on them at comps, but if I were to use them now, I'd use a couple indirect and do chicken direct.

http://i163.photobucket.com/albums/t310/swamprb/Alki/100_1962.jpg

Try it and see if it works for you.

The Pickled Pig
03-08-2011, 09:08 PM
If you had two grates in each one you could cook 2 briskets, 3 butts, 3 racks of ribs, and a grate of chicken and start as late as 7AM the morning of the contest.

I use 3 drums for convenience.

Contracted Cookers
03-08-2011, 09:24 PM
We get our butt kicked. all the time from trash cans

Q-Dat
03-08-2011, 09:31 PM
You might consider getting a Weber Kettle for chicken. Its much cheaper than a WSM, and many teams use them for chicken. Not because they are cheap, but because they do such a great job on it.

Anchors Smokeshop
03-08-2011, 09:44 PM
I agree with all of these guys. I've seen teams at comps win using drum's.
Two drums would be perfect. Pork butt and beef brisket in one drum and ribs and chicken in the second drum.
I use 2 WSM's at comps for my briskets, butts and ribs and a Weber Kettle for chicken.
I built a UDS during this offseason and I plan on using it at some comps this season.
I would definitely say go for it!

Rich Parker
03-09-2011, 05:43 AM
You could easily cook a comp on two drums!

I cook everything on two drums and use a an older wsm for the chicken.

I forgot I should point out my drums have 2 grates and a weber lid.

Hub
03-09-2011, 06:23 AM
What you cook on isn't important. It's HOW you cook on it! Having two cookers isn't absolutely necessary, but quite handy because of temperature/method/time differences. I use one cooker for butt and brisket and the other for chicken and ribs. You'll see some teams with a cooker for each, too. Have fun!

RangerJ
03-09-2011, 10:26 AM
I forgot I should point out my drums have 2 grates and a weber lid.

My drums are in the same configuration. I competed on them from my initial competition in 2009 until my last one in January.

They are currently taking a much needed vacation and possible retirement is in their future.

If you have 2 UDS's you will do just fine.

Meat Burner
03-09-2011, 09:04 PM
Yep, they work great for comps. It is pretty cool to see the competitors faces when they see us walk at the ceremonies. We use 2 drums for the brisket, butts, and ribs, and do chicken on the Weber. It's just fun!

worthsmokin
03-09-2011, 09:30 PM
We used 3 drums. One for pork, one for brisket, one for ribs. We did our chicken on a Weber Kettle. The nice thing is you can fit all of your stuff in the back of the truck.

Homebrewed Q
03-10-2011, 08:22 AM
What you cook on isn't important. It's HOW you cook on it! Having two cookers isn't absolutely necessary, but quite handy because of temperature/method/time differences. I use one cooker for butt and brisket and the other for chicken and ribs. You'll see some teams with a cooker for each, too. Have fun!

Amen! It's all about the cook and whatever pit you have. Just do it!

PigTamer
03-10-2011, 08:37 PM
Thanks guys, I do appreciate the information.

Southern Home Boy
03-11-2011, 11:46 AM
I use two drums; each with two racks and dome lids. I have a little ProQ that goes along for the ride, but seldom gets used.

smoke-n-my-i's
03-11-2011, 03:41 PM
I started out with 2 small offsets, and now I use an UGLY drum. I have the dome lid with 2 racks inside.... although the last time I cooked, I used 1 of the offsets and the drum. The 2nd drum is in the works. And yes, it can be done with no problem.

Chenernator
03-11-2011, 11:26 PM
If you had two grates in each one you could cook 2 briskets, 3 butts, 3 racks of ribs, and a grate of chicken and start as late as 7AM the morning of the contest.

I use 3 drums for convenience.

I agree with all of these guys. I've seen teams at comps win using drum's.
Two drums would be perfect. Pork butt and beef brisket in one drum and ribs and chicken in the second drum.

Do you put chicken above or below the ribs? If on top, don't you have issues with the chicken dripping on the ribs? Also, do you have to remove the top rack to get to the ribs (for foiling, basting, etc.)?

CajunSmoker
03-12-2011, 07:01 AM
we use 2 drums. cook our pork and brisket in seperate drums over night due to using different woods on each then we pull them and cooler the big meats which leave both drums available for ribs and chicken the morning of turn ins. never had a problem with timing.

Good luck!!!

Rich Parker
03-12-2011, 07:06 AM
Do you put chicken above or below the ribs? If on top, don't you have issues with the chicken dripping on the ribs? Also, do you have to remove the top rack to get to the ribs (for foiling, basting, etc.)?

Chicken never over anything unless it is in a pan.

If you plan it right you can have your ribs done and in a cambro or cooler before you start your chicken.

Chenernator
03-12-2011, 03:39 PM
we use 2 drums. cook our pork and brisket in seperate drums over night due to using different woods on each then we pull them and cooler the big meats which leave both drums available for ribs and chicken the morning of turn ins. never had a problem with timing.

Good luck!!!

How long do you end hold the big meats in the cooler? Sounds like it could be 6 or 7 hours?

Chicken never over anything unless it is in a pan.

If you plan it right you can have your ribs done and in a cambro or cooler before you start your chicken.

Hot and fast on the chicken? How long do you hold the ribs in the cambro?

Rich Parker
03-12-2011, 05:19 PM
How long do you end hold the big meats in the cooler? Sounds like it could be 6 or 7 hours?

Hot and fast on the chicken? How long do you hold the ribs in the cambro?

I pull my big cuts off around 9 - 10am and let them rest in a cambro until needed. I cook my chicken in 40 - 60 mins. I try not to hold ribs long in a cambro but have held them up to two hours before.

Just Pulin' Pork
03-12-2011, 09:51 PM
FYI the Pickled Pig won North Kansas City today, and I believe he cooked on 2 or 3 UDS's.

CajunSmoker
03-13-2011, 07:31 AM
How long do you end hold the big meats in the cooler? Sounds like it could be 6 or 7 hours?



Hot and fast on the chicken? How long do you hold the ribs in the cambro?

I usually start the pork and brisket about midnight and cooler around 6AM. They still aren't quite probe tender at that time and the time in the warm cooler full of towels lets them finish.

HarleyEarl
03-13-2011, 11:21 AM
Here's the set up I had in North Kansas City this weekend.

http://i1033.photobucket.com/albums/a418/Marc_Matthews/2010%20North%20Kansas%20City/102_44432.jpg

The UDS's performed better than the Traeger.

smalls65
03-13-2011, 01:13 PM
Dont have experiecne with the drums, but have seen teams use the drums all the time for comps...If you practice on your timing, you could definitely pull it off!!!! :-P

Bigmista
03-15-2011, 12:06 PM
I use drums when I want to travel light. I have shown up to contests with a drum in the back seat of my car.

bdodd444
03-15-2011, 12:09 PM
I thought I would jump in here as someone who was in the same position this time last year. I started with two drums, one for big meats and one for chicken and ribs. I then added a weber kettle for the chicken, ditched that and built a 3rd UDS. Right now I am running my Brisket and Pork all night in one UDS with a Guru (I don't care how well your UDS holds temp, the guru helps a small team get some sleep-not completely fool proof, but helps a lot). Ribs in another Guru controlled UDS, and Chicken in a manual controlled UDS.

I am toying with the idea of doing my brisket and pork in different UDS's this year, but haven't decided. One small warning, in my limited experience as a first year cook, the UDS draws a lot of attention from spectators. They may gawk at the 10K Jambo, but they seem to want to stop and talk extensively about the UDS. It is a great way to meet people, but my wife usually has run some interference around turn in times.

I am a huge fan of the UDS, and have received some nice calls. It is pretty rewarding to get a call from an entry cooked on something you built. Please just take the plunge and start competing. That was some of the best advice I ever got, and we loving cooking comps as a family now. Good Luck!

Brian

dgassaway
03-19-2011, 03:34 PM
I thought I would jump in here as someone who was in the same position this time last year. I started with two drums, one for big meats and one for chicken and ribs. I then added a weber kettle for the chicken, ditched that and built a 3rd UDS. Right now I am running my Brisket and Pork all night in one UDS with a Guru (I don't care how well your UDS holds temp, the guru helps a small team get some sleep-not completely fool proof, but helps a lot). Ribs in another Guru controlled UDS, and Chicken in a manual controlled UDS.

I am toying with the idea of doing my brisket and pork in different UDS's this year, but haven't decided. One small warning, in my limited experience as a first year cook, the UDS draws a lot of attention from spectators. They may gawk at the 10K Jambo, but they seem to want to stop and talk extensively about the UDS. It is a great way to meet people, but my wife usually has run some interference around turn in times.

I am a huge fan of the UDS, and have received some nice calls. It is pretty rewarding to get a call from an entry cooked on something you built. Please just take the plunge and start competing. That was some of the best advice I ever got, and we loving cooking comps as a family now. Good Luck!

Brian

I could not have said it better. Fire up the drums and start cooking, you have nothing to loose. We started last year on drums and ended up with a couple of GC's and an RGC under our belt. We even drug them across the country to the Royal and the Jack. Like Brian said, be prepared for people to gather around wanting to talk about your 55 gallon pits, they do gather lots of attention.

dgassaway
03-19-2011, 04:16 PM
I thought I would jump in here as someone who was in the same position this time last year. I started with two drums, one for big meats and one for chicken and ribs. I then added a weber kettle for the chicken, ditched that and built a 3rd UDS. Right now I am running my Brisket and Pork all night in one UDS with a Guru (I don't care how well your UDS holds temp, the guru helps a small team get some sleep-not completely fool proof, but helps a lot). Ribs in another Guru controlled UDS, and Chicken in a manual controlled UDS.

I am toying with the idea of doing my brisket and pork in different UDS's this year, but haven't decided. One small warning, in my limited experience as a first year cook, the UDS draws a lot of attention from spectators. They may gawk at the 10K Jambo, but they seem to want to stop and talk extensively about the UDS. It is a great way to meet people, but my wife usually has run some interference around turn in times.

I am a huge fan of the UDS, and have received some nice calls. It is pretty rewarding to get a call from an entry cooked on something you built. Please just take the plunge and start competing. That was some of the best advice I ever got, and we loving cooking comps as a family now. Good Luck!

Brian

I could not have said it better. Fire up the drums and start cooking, you have nothing to loose. We started last year on drums and ended up with a couple of GC's and an RGC under our belt. We even drug them across the country to the Royal and the Jack. Like Brian said, be prepared for people to gather around wanting to talk about your 55 gallon pits, they do gather lots of attention.