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Q-Dat
03-06-2011, 07:15 AM
When more than one type of sample is put in a box such as with Pork when pulled, chunks, and slices of Money Muscle are all placed in the box in equal amounts. Do the judges try each one, or do they select just one piece to taste? Or does it depend on the judge?

Just wondering. Thanks.

BBQ_Mayor
03-06-2011, 07:46 AM
There are suppose to try each type that is put in the box. Make sure all our types/styles that you put in the box are of equal excellence.

olewarthog
03-06-2011, 07:50 AM
When more than one type of sample is put in a box such as with Pork when pulled, chunks, and slices of Money Muscle are all placed in the box in equal amounts. Do the judges try each one, or do they select just one piece to taste? Or does it depend on the judge?

Just wondering. Thanks.

In GBA, judges are instructed to sample each type. When I serve as a table monitor, I remind my table of this.

smokeyw
03-06-2011, 07:57 AM
I also asked in the judging class that I attended which one to score, for instance if you liked one sample type better than another. I was instructed to score the one that I liked the best. So it would definitely be to a cooks advantage to include more than one sample type if possible.

There are suppose to try each type that is put in the box. Make sure all our types/styles that you put in the box are of equal excellence.

Q-Dat
03-06-2011, 08:24 AM
Much appreciated answers guys. I suspected/hoped that this was the case. I believe I can get equally good samples of all three types on pork.

Now I just gotta work on getting sliced flat and "Burnt Ends" right at the same time!

Lake Dogs
03-06-2011, 08:42 AM
I cant think of a sanctioning body off the top of my head that give judges a choice
where this is concerned. If it's presented, it's sampled/tried. Also, remember that
it's sampled/tried by every judge. If the body requires 5 pieces, make sure you have
at least 5 pieces of each thing. If 6, then minimum 6.

gmholler
03-06-2011, 08:47 AM
Most judges don't know (or care) about what individual piece is what or how one type is supposed to be so much better than another - they go for what LOOKS GOOD - it's just human nature. Are they supposed to try each type? Yes. But sometimes there's not enough in the box for each judge to do that. And no one judge wants to get known as a "pig" that takes everything! Most of them are serious about what they're doing and don't try to make a meal at the expense of the cooks - they know they're there just to sample. Does it depend upon the judge? Lots of times, yes. Probably the best thing to do, if you want to have several types of meat in the box, make sure they ALL look good and there's enough for ALL to take a sample of each.

Lynn H.

Bunny
03-06-2011, 09:29 AM
I also asked in the judging class that I attended which one to score, for instance if you liked one sample type better than another. I was instructed to score the one that I liked the best. So it would definitely be to a cooks advantage to include more than one sample type if possible.

Whenever a cook enters more than one sample type for judges to try, judges are taught to try each as long as there is enough samples for all six judges. However, I've never been taught or taught a class that told someone to score the better piece. Different samples in an entry tray could either help or hurt and entry. I've heard judges comment that if they would have stopped at the first entry the score would have been better. But because the cooker put in all types of samples (sliced, chunked, etc) the judge takes all samples into consideration for a score. It also works the other way around. I know that a judge's score will go up if the second piece of sample was better than the first. Depends on the judge. They are to be taking the whole entry into consideration, not just one piece.

ModelMaker
03-06-2011, 09:42 AM
In my neck of the woods, if you put several cuts in the box I will try each one. But you better make sure they are all up to snuff. If your big fat piece of pulled pork with tasty bark is supreme and you throw in some mushy money muscle.
IT"S GONNA COST YA!!!
Personal experience from team HART BURN.....
Ed

smokeyw
03-06-2011, 09:58 AM
This was a very specific question and that was the answer. It is good to know however, that every judge has not been taught the same and is not on the same page with this.

Whenever a cook enters more than one sample type for judges to try, judges are taught to try each as long as there is enough samples for all six judges. However, I've never been taught or taught a class that told someone to score the better piece. Different samples in an entry tray could either help or hurt and entry. I've heard judges comment that if they would have stopped at the first entry the score would have been better. But because the cooker put in all types of samples (sliced, chunked, etc) the judge takes all samples into consideration for a score. It also works the other way around. I know that a judge's score will go up if the second piece of sample was better than the first. Depends on the judge. They are to be taking the whole entry into consideration, not just one piece.

BRBBQ
03-06-2011, 11:07 AM
I try to sample every thing

Bentley
03-06-2011, 12:40 PM
When more than one type of sample is put in a box such as with Pork when pulled, chunks, and slices of Money Muscle are all placed in the box in equal amounts. Do the judges try each one, or do they select just one piece to taste? Or does it depend on the judge?

Just wondering. Thanks.


I think it depends on the judge, I make no excuesses that if I err in judging I am going to err on the side of the team. I used to take all meat that was presented and if one piece was better then another I would judge according to that philosophy. In the lasts couple of years, KCBS reps have been advising judges that they should average the meat, and that is how I now do it. Not my 1st choice, but I try not to be a scofflaw!

Pig Headed
03-06-2011, 07:07 PM
I was taught to sample each of the types turned in. If say the money muscle was great and the pulled was mediocre then you averaged them out for the score. If it's turned in and tasted, they're all scored not just the best sample.

Rookie'48
03-07-2011, 01:10 AM
I also asked in the judging class that I attended which one to score, for instance if you liked one sample type better than another. I was instructed to score the one that I liked the best. So it would definitely be to a cooks advantage to include more than one sample type if possible.

If that was a KCBS class then I think that your instructor needs to take a class! We're suppossed to judge the entry "as presented by the cook". To me that means that if you put it in the box you want me to judge it.

I've had Bunny as a cook, Rep and as a fellow judge at contests where I've judged and her feelings on this point are pretty well known :thumb:.

ModelMaker knows this also.

smokeyw
03-07-2011, 04:36 AM
Without calling names, this instructor was very well known and is well respected by all. He is a KCBS PHB. He emphasized looking for the very best barbecue instead of the worse. He said if you err, do so in favor of the cooks.

If that was a KCBS class then I think that your instructor needs to take a class! We're suppossed to judge the entry "as presented by the cook". To me that means that if you put it in the box you want me to judge it.

I've had Bunny as a cook, Rep and as a fellow judge at contests where I've judged and her feelings on this point are pretty well known :thumb:.

ModelMaker knows this also.

CBQ
03-07-2011, 07:23 AM
My judging instructions for KCBS were along the same lines as what Bunny said. If there are six pieces of each cut in the box, I will sample each one and score the average, so if something didn't come out well, don't put it in.

Much appreciated answers guys. I suspected/hoped that this was the case. I believe I can get equally good samples of all three types on pork.

Now I just gotta work on getting sliced flat and "Burnt Ends" right at the same time!

Since Q-Dat hijacked his own thread: You can't. Cut the flat off and rest it in a cooler when it's done, and leave the point on longer.

carlyle
03-07-2011, 10:51 AM
The reps at our KCBS contest remind our judges to sample each type of entry when

multiple types are in the same box. It is what I do when I judge. There needs to be more consistency of instruction however. I have been at tables where this is not done
by everyone at the table.

My score for that entry is based on everything I have sampled.

Bunny
03-07-2011, 11:04 AM
I agree with you Chris. I took a Rod Gray, Pellet Envy class, and that's exactly what he taught us as cooks. If it isn't good, don't put it in the box. As instructors, we've been taught to try all pieces presented as long as there is enough and judge the entire entry. Hopefully cooks put enough in there if that's the way they present it.

Bunny

Sticks-n-chicks
03-07-2011, 01:31 PM
We've always gone with the opinion if one type of pork (pulled, chunks or slices) detracts from the other then don't put in the box.