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Smokin' Aces
03-03-2011, 08:05 PM
i have been trying make a competition style chili and i have not had any success. can anyone lend a helping hand

deez butts
03-03-2011, 10:45 PM
i have been trying make a competition style chili and i have not had any success. can anyone lend a helping hand

Sure! Is this for an ICS or CASI comp? Send me a pm with your questions and I can help you out. I compete in both red and verde.

Chipper
03-04-2011, 05:05 AM
Same here.

Smokenstein & monster crew
03-04-2011, 09:48 AM
Fresh ingrediants, little spice, lotta love, little luck

Westexbbq
03-04-2011, 10:30 AM
Talk to me at the upcoming card game.

MattCom
03-04-2011, 01:06 PM
Talk to me at the upcoming card game.
Mind if I eavesdrop?:becky:

The Pickled Pig
03-04-2011, 02:06 PM
shhh....

http://www.betterthanhot.com/Preparing%20Competition%20Chili.pdf

Bones
03-04-2011, 02:56 PM
shhh....

http://www.betterthanhot.com/Preparing%20Competition%20Chili.pdf

That looks more complicated than BBQ

Smokin' Aces
03-22-2011, 11:22 PM
That looks more complicated than BBQ



i agree

4 smokin butts
03-22-2011, 11:33 PM
start with wendys,add pork chunks,beef ,bean, onions,paste ,tomatoes,a bottle tiger sauce great chili

jbrink01
03-22-2011, 11:36 PM
Depends on where you're competing. I cooked ICS chili in my hometown and lost bad teh 1st time. I then won 3 years in a row cooking a traditional mid-western farmhouse style chili.

Lake Dogs
03-23-2011, 08:33 AM
It's called "Texas Red". The sanctioning bodies enforce it. It's not my favorite to eat,
but it is fun to compete at it (I'm the local Pod membership guy for CASI).

The write up at the URL above is really pretty good. I'm not certain if they mentioned
it, but if you're accustomed to cooking chili with vegetables & beans you're in for a
huge shock when it comes to sodium. Veggies & beans really absorb sodium and keep
the taste away from the tongue. Without them, everything else being equal, you
end up with chili gone salt-lick. GHASTLY bad. Look to salt/sodium free or low sodium
ingredients.

You'll get it to 2 or 3 dumps of seasonings, once you get accustomed to it. Start
with browning your meat with a tiny amount of oil/grease. You'll probably season it
a little here. Then in goes the tomato sauce. Right here look to the lower sodium
ones. I use Contadina and Wally World (mix). Bring to a slow boil and in goes the
first major dump of seasonings. Reduce to a simmer. For mine I go the 2nd drop
1 hour before the final turn-in. Thin with water if needed.

For perfection you'll want at very least a mild chili "burn" initially early on the tongue,
then in the middle, and later with a mild chili after-burn. To do this you'll need a
mix of peppers. Black, white, cayenne, ancho, small amount of ground jalepeno,
etc will help with this.

It's like barbecue in that you dont want to offend the judges. Too salty and you're
gone. Too hot, same thing. Not spicy at all, same thing. Middle of the way gets
it.

There's an art to the turn-in cups. First, season the cup about an hour before turn
in (I usually do this right after my 2nd drop). The simplest way to do this is to
take some chili powder and a little garlic powder and put it in the cup. Then fill the
cup with hot/steaming water. Take a clove of garlic, sliced, and rub it gently along
the top of the cup. Then close the cup and shake it up a little. Allow it to sit/steep
for 10 minutes or so, then dump the water and wipe it off (clean the cup and lid).
*voila* you're done. You've effectively removed the styrofoam smell and taste from
the cup and replaced it with a chili smell.

Put your chili in the cup about 5 minutes before turn-in and allow it to sit. You're
looking for the grease to rise to the top. Immediately right before you turn your
chili in, take a small spoon and skim off all of the grease. Stir and go.

gsmith
03-23-2011, 09:48 AM
Great info in this thread. :thumb:

I ate some "red" from a champion chili cooker while in Texas and it was great but I wouldn't want to eat a bowl of it - comp chili is way different than chili you make at home

Lake Dogs
03-23-2011, 10:15 AM
Great info in this thread. :thumb:

I ate some "red" from a champion chili cooker while in Texas and it was great but I wouldn't want to eat a bowl of it - comp chili is way different than chili you make at home

It's either really good, or really NOT good, with very little in between.
I like it, generally, but it's still not my favorite, and I've done what now,
probably 200 sanctioned chili cookoffs, give or take.

I'm the guy who teaches/charges the judges. CASI doesnt certify judges,
so if they're not trained a little we end up with WILD scores. I had one
time where I got all 8's and 9's, and a 1 from this one person. Her score
took me from 1st place to tied for 5th... a ONE?!?!?! I would hope warm
dog feces would be better than a ONE!!! Ok, maybe not, but seriously...

Learn to value what judge certification and training bring... KCBS could
really benefit from working on this, IMHO.

Chipper
03-23-2011, 12:23 PM
There is talk of the ICS actually holding training classes for judges. I too have been the victim of novice judges from both CASI and the ICS.
However, regardless of how much training, just like BBQ, personal preference is a huge factor in scoring.
We could go on forever with some of the comments, I've seen. But my all time favorite is "needs more beans".

Chipper
03-23-2011, 12:26 PM
I appreciate the link to our site and that is a very complicated version of what competitive chili cooks do.

Lake Dogs
03-23-2011, 01:11 PM
Chipper, it is a large write-up, to be certain. However, it's probably as thorough as
any I've ever seen, with a lot of general cooking competition stuff thrown in. It's
probably over-kill, but thorough.

I think it would be very cool if ICS and/or CASI would go down the certified chili
judge route. Judges pull some silly stuff; stuff that I'd never had guessed if I hadn't
witnessed it myself.

For me the worst to witness was in an open chili event where a judge, who
volunteered herself for this mind you, wouldn't touch a chili saying "it looked like
deer poop". She gave it a 1. Sadly, this was probably the best black bean
chili I'd ever eaten. She single handed removed them from all awards. Why would
you volunteer to judge an open chili contest if you're not prepared to judge
the chilis (black beans too) that come across the table.

She volunteered again the next year; I made sure she worked the receiving table
and didnt judge.


LOL -> Love the "needs more beans" comment! DOH!!!!


Any fun stories about what comes across the table in an open chili cookoff? I've
seen some *interesting* stuff, from mushrooms to pasta to even water chestnuts
in it. Very strange. I did get a lesson one time in a peoples choice contest where
the winners didnt even make chili. They purchased (they were a large team with $$$)
140 thick rib eyes and had 3 guys on the grills. 4 women would take them off, cooked
medium rare, lightly season them, and then roll/dip the pieces in a very light chiliesque
sauce, and present seasoned rib eye. From a taste perspective, it was AWESOME.
'course, it wasnt chili... From that point onward we dont play peoples choice and
rarely do open contests at all.

deez butts
03-23-2011, 02:12 PM
There is talk of the ICS actually holding training classes for judges. I too have been the victim of novice judges from both CASI and the ICS.
However, regardless of how much training, just like BBQ, personal preference is a huge factor in scoring.
We could go on forever with some of the comments, I've seen. But my all time favorite is "needs more beans".


Yeah, ICS just implemented a judging certification. I don't have any details about it but they announced it a few months ago.